Lockedquestion on tumbling

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splante
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2010/12/24 06:10:18 (permalink)

question on tumbling

question on tumbling,
just wondering if tumbling a bottle is kind of like removing the original finish off of antique funiture. That can greatly reduce th furnitures value. I mean if i bought a 1800's bottle that was like new condition i would be skeptical. Any thoughts
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    blobbottlebob
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    RE: question on tumbling 2010/12/24 11:26:06 (permalink)
    Hey Splante,
    Topics like this have been bounced around for years on the site. Some people love tumbled bottles beause they sparkle and shine like new. Others prefer to maintain the actual history of a glass artifact by leaving a few scuffs or stains. I am one of these types who likes bottles as found but clean.
     
    As far as seeing old bottles in new condition, its great when it happens. I have some real gems that were never tumbled but look minty fresh. It unusual but its great when it happens.
     
    My main concern with tumbling is that the process does remove a surface layer of glass. That is modifying the bottle. But tumbling is an art form - the guys that do it can tell you. If you cut a bottle too much, in my opinion, you are badly damaging it. It starts to gets this oily greasy shine that looks aweful. Thats just me. If you cut a minimum amount and know what you're doing, you defintely can improve some hazy stained bottles into something more like their original style.
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    buriedtreasuretime
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    RE: question on tumbling 2010/12/24 12:23:16 (permalink)
    I agree with Blobbottlebob in regards to that overly tumbled look of greasy or too shiny feeling glass. Bottles 100 plus years old should stay that way, especially the ones that come out of the earth being buried for a century. To me it's all about the historic fabric that we lose when we try to make them new again. Embossing becomes less prominent and the opalesence disapears, and to top that off the fine bubbles often burst leaving that gray polishing stuff to infiltrate the bubbles. Naw, I like em natural!
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    splante
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    RE: question on tumbling 2010/12/24 18:41:24 (permalink)
    yeah I feel the same way clean it as best you can and leave it,natural
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    andy volkerts
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    RE: question on tumbling 2011/01/21 02:52:54 (permalink)
    I feel that tumbling bottles is okay if you know what you are doing, and do not over tumble them. It takes a lot of practice with a tumbler to get it right. I have been tumbling bottles for about ten years now and feel pretty confidant with my system for useing my tumbler. I have a variable speed tumbler from very few revolutions thru pretty fast. I use a medium speed with square bottles and a bit faster with round ones. there are several grits and polishers you can use. I buy all my stuff from the Jar Doctor, and he has a good selecttion. You should start with some of the finer grits and polishes and work into the larger grit sizes after you kind of get a feel for how fast the glass will cut, or clean. Try it on some of the junk bottles first. Usually amber glass is a bit softer than clear and cobalt. Check on your bottles every day until you know there cleaning rate. rust stain sickness of the glass are all defects tumbling will take care of unless it is really really bad. just remember at first , practice practice practice. it took me at least a year before I tumbled my first bottle that was valued over a hundred dollars. It was a Rohrers tonic, and it came out beautiful.........Andy

    wanted....All cure bottles not already in my collection.....And a few meds from San Francisco
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    cowseatmaize
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    RE: question on tumbling 2011/01/21 05:07:49 (permalink)
    just wondering if tumbling a bottle is kind of like removing the original finish off of antique funiture. That can greatly reduce th furnitures value. I mean if i bought a 1800's bottle that was like new condition i would be skeptical. Any thoughts

    That's more a matter of opinion with bottles. I don't think it diminishes it in the same way as furniture or cleaning the patina off a bronze.
    Some old bottles do get found in attics, walls and other protected areas. I'll bet you could tell the difference between the two luster's when side by side. Others just know.
    I always feel that it you have a high end bottle and want to sell it, leave it. A true collector will buy it and do it themselves if they want. They'll at least have the choice. Others will pay more if they plan to anyway. It's one less chance of breaking it.
    In a good auction tumbled bottles will usually (and always should) disclose that info.

    post edited by cowseatmaize - 2011/01/21 05:14:10

    Eric
    When I was a kid....... I was a lot younger.
     
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