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05-01-2009, 06:44 PM
I apologize if this is a stupid question, but I am a newb here. I have heard some references to "Grades" (quality) of bottles, such as "grade 7" or "grade 9". I have searched for some reference that would outline some kind of a quality scale with no luck. Is there any kind of established guidelines or standards for "grading" bottles?

Thanks

"There are no stupid questions, just stupid people" - Mr. Garrison

glass man
05-01-2009, 08:22 PM
I DON'T THINK THERE IS ANY THING SET IN STONE,BUT MINT SEEMS TO BE [TO ME] A BOTTLE THAT LOOKS LIKE IT WAS MADE YESTERDAY. NEAR MINT HAS LITE HAZE OR SO..IT DESENDS FROM THERE. BUT I HAVE NOTICED IT IS JUBJECTIVE AND ONE MANS MINT IS ANOTHER MANS NEAR MINT. FOR INSTANCE AS LONG AS THER ARE NO CRACKS,CHIPS,ETC.SOME SAY MINT. MINT COMES DOWN WHAT DO YOU THINK WHAT IS MINT? JAMIE

Oldtimer
05-01-2009, 08:55 PM
Never heard a number system used, but that don't mean there isn't one the high end dealers and auctions use...
It's so subjective...."mint" is very very hard to come by...as Jamie said, most people's "mint" bottles have flea bites or tiny bruises...
"Near mint" is a far better description for 999 out of 1,000 "mint" bottles.
And lets face it: any bottle that isn't truly "mint" is damaged. Damaged is damaged, and what need is there to grade damage.
My personal guide is this: If the bottle can still be used for the intended purpose...it's "good enough" for me. If it held liquid, but has cracks...and still holds liquid...it's worth keeping to me.

mgardziella
05-01-2009, 09:08 PM
There is a number scale for ACL sodas given in the book "Collecting Applied Color Label Soda Bottles: Third Edition."
From worst to best-

5= Bad Condition - Portions of the label unreadable. Paint faded badly and/or stained. Badly chipped and scratched. Would only be saved if rare or unusual and displayed in dimly lit area.
4= Poor Condition - Scratches, chips staining and minor paint peeling that detract when displayed.
3= Fair Condition - Noticeable scratches and casewear. A few small chip and staining.
2= Good Condition - Minor scratches, fading and discoloration visible from arm's length. No chips or peeling paint.
1= Excellent Condition - Minor scratches. Display side of label in Near Mint (1+) condition.
1+= Near Mint Condition - No flaws visible when held at arms length.
M= Mint - Very close to perfection and in the new and unused condition.

div2roty
05-01-2009, 11:57 PM
To me that ACL grading system goes backwards. I also like grading systems out of 10, like those used with comics and baseball cards.

As far as bottles go, American Bottle Auctions (from Cali) uses a number system out of 10, with 10 being attic mint.

buzzkutt033
05-02-2009, 08:28 AM
there are various grading systems used in sportscard collecting. this one seems to apply best to what we do. what i like with the Beckett system is the subgrades. these qualify individual characteristics, then these numbers are averaged for an overall grade. it also points out specific defects which the buyer may have difficulty seeing. subgrades such as; embossing, surface, color etc could be used.

jim

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/8925/C27CE6BE4A5E4D9E872967CFA1A6C1B1.jpg

RICKJJ59W
05-02-2009, 08:46 AM
Here is my # system...

1. Junk
2.keeper
3.Nice
4.wow!
5.HOLY S!@#$T!!! [:D]

Oldihtractor
05-02-2009, 08:54 AM
I would have to agree with Rick.... You know it when you see it!!!

tigue710
05-02-2009, 02:27 PM
I just use this

1: I like it

2: I dont

the auction houses such as glassworks and I think american use a grading sytem of 1 - 10, but they vary so much with it I dont think it really falls into any sytem, more of just numbers they make up...

I've oftem seen this; "bottle is a near 9.5, except its cracked, so that makes up to you!" Instead of saying its a 2 or 3 they make up some bull like that...

Just give a good honest descrition, note any imperfections or damage...

The best terms are flea bite, pin prick, flake, open bubble, these mean damage but not damage that really hurts the bottle... stuff that could be fixed with a little buffing and you would never know it was there... be very specific, and honest as these terms are taking quite literally...

also do not forget to mention any cloudiness or stain.

baltbottles
05-02-2009, 04:06 PM
I'm with Tigue on this that I don't think any numeric grading system for antique bottles will ever work. Simply because how many truly mint bottles are out there. Any alteration of the bottles surface including base wear should be considered damage in the case of a bottle being truly mint.

However base wear is usually looked at as acceptable by collectors simply because it helps to show the bottles age.

I also agree that the best practice is simply a good honest description that states any damage or other distractions clearly to the buyer. Also if the bottle has been tumbled that should be stated when the bottle is sold. The buyer should be aware that he is getting a cleaned bottle not one that is an indoor find and wasn't altered.

I know if I buy a bottle as an attic find and when it arrives it shows evidence of being tumbled I will send it back or request a discount. This is one of the reasons I will buy a stained dug bottle over a tumbled example simply because I know the dug example has not been altered or messed with.

Chris

GuntherHess
05-02-2009, 05:24 PM
good photos and a thorough discription of any condition issues is what is needed to judge a bottle. A numeric grading system just confuses the process in my mind.