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View Full Version : A new old guy to the site



ralphwvw
10-20-2005, 06:02 PM
First, thanks all for having this site here. Have looked it over for a couple of days and am very impressed with the depth and breadth of knowledge I've seen :) I've been kind of collecting canning jars for a while, have one I'd like to show you all but can't get it photographed well enough to post. It's a Ball, I think a quart (9"tall, 4.5" wide at base, 2.5" mouth opening, very light green, bullet-shaped or tapered is the best way I can describe it [in other words, no "shoulder", just a thin seam where the threaded portion was attached - one of the zinc/porcelain lids seems to fit like a glove], on the side "Ball" written in raised cursive script, a "4" and roman "IV" on the base. Will continue to try and photograph it (the cursive script is the part I can't get to show up in the digitals). I bought it at an antique shop over 30 years ago, just curious if I have provided enough info for some kind of identification.

ralphwvw
10-20-2005, 10:30 PM
O.K., have some decent pics now.......

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/4744/Mk25369.jpg

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/4744/Cz79750.jpg

ralphwvw
10-20-2005, 10:31 PM
2nd shot of side showing how "light" the actually raised lettering is.

ralphwvw
10-20-2005, 10:33 PM
O.K., o.k., new guy can't work the buttons yet :) Here's the one for above....

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/4744/Mk25001.jpg

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/4744/Fd92052.jpg

ralphwvw
10-20-2005, 10:34 PM
And, the bottom.....

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/4744/Pn37209.jpg

madman
10-21-2005, 02:26 AM
hey ralph your jar dates from 1896 to 1910 ive also found ball jars with light embossment, im not sure what the story is on that mike

ralphwvw
10-21-2005, 02:35 AM
Thanks Mike :) It is probably the nicest jar I have in my collection, definately the most cherished. FYI, I did find a source for old Ball info at their website, and am awaiting a reply from their archivist now. If I get anything, will post it here, along with that email address for others in the future to use.

Hoosier49er
10-21-2005, 10:46 AM
Hi Ralph!
Welcome to the forum! Your jar dates from 1896-1910. It is Red Book 193. It looks like you have a 1/2 gallon? They list at $2-3 in aqua, $6-8 in Ball blue, and $8-10 in light green. I'ts hard to tell color from the pics some times. Hope this helps.
Joe

ralphwvw
10-22-2005, 02:40 AM
Hi all, I resized the photos except for the bottom (which I sort of killed), so I left the original post. Can't really give you a color, as I am seriously color deficient (not color blind, just don't see the same colors folks with normal color vision see). Just curious about the age mostly. The Ball archivist gave me the same time frame of manufacture as well as some neat additional info as to which company actually made the jar: "Your jar is a shoulder-seal, triple L Ball mason jar. Shoulder-seal means that there is no ledge between the shoulder and the threads, like modern jars. The jar sealed with the rubber on the shoulder, exactly where the rubber is on your jar. Triple L is the style of the logo. The loop looks like a third L that has fallen over a bit. All this tell us that your jar was made between 1898 and 1910 in Muncie. We can narrow it down a little further. Look at the seam on the side of the jar. Follow it up to the threads. If the seam goes straight through the threads, the jar was made on a Ball-Bingham glass machine. If the seam through the threads is offset from the side seam [which mine is], your jar was made on an F. C. Ball machine. The Ball-Bingham machine was patented in 1906, while the F. C. machine was patented in 1898. Both machines were probably used to make this jar until 1910 with this logo. While you didn’t ask, these are not particular rare, and list for only $2 to $3 in the latest price guide. Which machine made the jar does not effect the price. I do think that half-gallons, which yours is, are harder to find, and should command about twice the price." Very nice fellow that archivist, name of Richard Cole, www.minnetrista.net.