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View Full Version : Earliest known Iron Pontilled Bottles



beendiggin
03-27-2013, 03:11 PM
I would like to see some examples of early iron pontilled bottles. I don't have any, so I'm no help, but what are the earliest known examples of iron pontillled bottles. A recent post about the broken Alfs sodas listed on E bay has made me curious as to the earliest known use of that method of empontilling. Thanks for any help.

botlguy
03-27-2013, 04:18 PM
I have always used the dates of 1855 - 1865 +/- a few years. That has been the answer to that question for 45 + years but it could have been changed over that time. I'm listening to smarter minds, better researchers.

epackage
03-27-2013, 04:24 PM
Here's my 1850 example...



https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/10927/B1DC89A75A5E43D0967E620D0D90CEE8.jpg

myersdiggers1998
03-27-2013, 04:32 PM
my only I.P.

https://www.antique-bottles.net/upfiles/8645/1B79BA0BA3324A009D290F9FF8F7E8E6.jpg

botlguy
03-27-2013, 04:42 PM
ORIGINAL: epackage
Here's my 1850 example...

Jim, does that bottle actually date to 1850 or could that be an "Established" sort of date? I'm not really doubting it, just trying to really pin it down.

epackage
03-27-2013, 05:37 PM
ORIGINAL: botlguy
Jim, does that bottle actually date to 1850 or could that be an "Established" sort of date? I'm not really doubting it, just trying to really pin it down.

Archdeacon started in 1847 Jim...

Road Dog
03-27-2013, 06:41 PM
The Courtland Street Tweddles all date pre 1849. Tweddle was first listed in 1843-44. These were open pontils no doubt. I think 1846-49 would be the iron pontil Courtland street Tweddles. In 1849/50 Tweddle Jr was operating from the Barclay address.I also have a J & A Dearborn that dates 1849-50 that is iron pontil.

botlguy
03-27-2013, 08:54 PM
Even though this was Paul's original thread / post and this issue has been discussed before I thank you all for your education and documentation. This part of bottle collecting interests me almost as much as the bottles themselves.

beendiggin
03-27-2013, 09:05 PM
It's sort of an unexact science due to all the different bottle makers and the overlappping of methods individual glashouses and perhaps individual glasblowers used. We can obviously use dated bottles and other known timelines of manufacturing to pin down the glass makers methods. Very interesting post. I wish I saw examples of pontilled sodas here in Maine but, unfortunately, there is basically none.

andy volkerts
03-27-2013, 09:26 PM
Just on all the sodas I have seen over the years, I would safeley state that 1843 would be the earliest that iron pontils came into usage, I have tried to run patent dates and the earliest I could find was 1847, I will try to find that search and get back with the info re who and where.........

tigue710
03-28-2013, 01:30 PM
I believe they were using the metallic pontil process in some places as early as the mid 1840's, but that the process was not in general use until mid 1850's. I think it was a contemporary of the open pontil process but outlived it a little longer, with the sticky ball process going out of use earliest.

baltbottles
03-28-2013, 09:32 PM
For Baltimore sodas 1836-1844 would be open pontil sodas 1845-1857 would be iron pontiled 1858 and forward would be smooth base This does not apply to torpedo and ten pin sodas. This rule also works well for Philadelphia sodas. Now the odd later 1840s and 1850s soda will show up with an open pontil but these are glass blowing flukes not a standard production technique. There may be a bit of overlap in iron and open pontil usage during 1843-45 as that was the transitional change over for standard soda bottle production.

Chris