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View Full Version : Girolamo Pagliamo : medicine, grass green color



ND_IXL
01-16-2015, 10:49 PM
I recently purchased this small pontilled med and I haven't been able to find any information about it. The bottle stands 4in tall and is 1 1/4in in width, I would describe the color as a light grass green and there is a very pronounced open pontil on the base, the bottle has an inward rolled lip and is heavily whittled. I'll be posting pics shortly. Any information such as value, rarity, and origin would be appreciated. I'm fairly new to collecting and am focusing on pontilled medicines.
Thanks,
Nick

ND_IXL
01-16-2015, 10:52 PM
Sorry, the bottle reads Girolamo vertically on one side and Pagliano vertically on the other side

ND_IXL
01-16-2015, 10:59 PM
Here are the pics, let me know what you think.Thanks,Nick

cowseatmaize
01-17-2015, 12:37 AM
All I can say is it's Italian, Florence I think. I looked it up some years back and there was info online but in Italian.It looks to be an early one, 1850's maybe.Nice looking bottle.

ND_IXL
01-17-2015, 12:43 AM
Thanks, I was thinking it might be Italian. When I purchased it I at first thought it was American with just an Italian maker simply because it was purchased from an American collection with no other foreign bottles. I payed $70 for it, anyway I think it's an interesting bottle.

cowseatmaize
01-17-2015, 03:00 AM
Just for yuks and wiggles I ran this wiki.Italy through google translate. It states he died in 1881 but I know the name continued for many years afterwards. He was born in Genoa to a family of Neapolitan origin [ 2 ] . Baritone failure , Pagliano had some luck , since 1838 , selling a syrup purgative beneficial properties .

Then bought the palace in Florence which was built on the area occupied until 1834 by the Prison Stinche . In 1854 it turned into theater and , for the realization of the work , he used the architect Telemaco Bonaiuti , helped by his son Charles , and the painters Luigi Dell'Era and Cesare Maffei . The theater Pagliano ( 1901 Teatro Verdi ) , on whose story is variously focused Aldo Palazzeschi , opened September 10, 1854 , with a performance of Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi opera at the time called Viscardello . In 1865 the theater suffered a fire and was forced to sell it Pagliano debtors [ 3 ] .

Girolamo Pagliano is also cited by Carlo Collodi , who said of him : Who was Girolamo Pagliano is useless to repeat here : now all the intestines of Europe knows by heart ! [ 4 ] . Besides your brochure leaflet for the syrup , published in 1856 under the title from Barbčra medicine for fathers or the doctor himself and the children , but better known as Libretto Pagliano , turned out a sort of best seller ante -litteram , having had a print run of five million copies in less than fifty years , having been translated into six languages ??( greek , French, English , Russian, German and Spanish ) , for another with different reprints for each of them , and even sung in verse in a poem [ 5 ] .

He is buried in the Cemetery of the Holy Doors of Florence , where he died September 9, 1881 [ 6 ] .

RED Matthews
01-18-2015, 02:19 PM
Wow Eric, I like the follow-up you do. You are special to the Forum. RED M.

ND_IXL
01-18-2015, 03:15 PM
Thanks Eric! That was some awesome information. Its amazing how much history can be connected to a bottle, very interesting.

RED Matthews
02-03-2015, 07:50 PM
So Nick. I have a write up for new collectors - If you follow my path, I am mainly only interested in glass that was blown on a blowpipe and formed by several methods for a lot of different things. Most of my glass saved is hand made and mouth blown. Some free formed and some blown in a dip mold or a two part mold with a bottom plate, and some early glass was blown in a mold that had threads on the neck - and the threads were in that top of the mold - with the blowpipe just broken off - and is refereed to a burst off finish - that is rough on the top edge. Everyone that collects - tries to get what interests them best. I started with an empty milk bottle that I drank the milk out of at a neighbors dairy farm. A lot of the story is in my home opage - shown below. RED Matthews

RED Matthews
02-07-2015, 12:38 PM
I just repacked a box of med bottles yesterday and a box of inks. I really like to study old glass items, and this one you showed us is really neat. I havent had a chance to study an tooled riolled in finish. I have a lot of tooled finish products - and would like to see a couple pictures of what y0u have on this one. I am not familiar with the type of tool they used to make them, but assume it was a closing plier type of forming tool, probably wood - but I doubt if it would last long. Thanks for showing this one. RED Mastthews

ND_IXL
02-07-2015, 01:37 PM
Your welcome Red! I will post more detailed pictures later tonight or tomorrow. I would be interested in hearing more about the bottle as well.

ND_IXL
02-12-2015, 06:09 PM
Sorry red I've been having trouble with uploading the pictures.. Trying again tonight

ND_IXL
02-12-2015, 08:55 PM
Here's the best picture I could take! Hope these work for ya Red, let me know what ya think :) 3 more pics coming in a minute

ND_IXL
02-12-2015, 08:57 PM
3 more

sandchip
02-13-2015, 06:16 AM
Thanks, I was thinking it might be Italian. When I purchased it I at first thought it was American with just an Italian maker simply because it was purchased from an American collection with no other foreign bottles. I payed $70 for it, anyway I think it's an interesting bottle.


I always wondered because it sure looks American made. Great looking bottle.

ND_IXL
02-13-2015, 08:29 AM
Yeah me too Jimbo. This bottle has an amazing amount of whittle and orange peel look as well, not to mention the strange grass green color! From what I've gathered so far I believe it dates from 1835-1845 a very early example. Let me know what you guys think of my start of my first color run. I'm trying for all the G.W Merchant variations in as many colors as I can find, 2 of these examples were dug by yours truly :) from left to right we have A Deep forest green 5 1/2 in by 3 1/2 in by 2in with applied sloping collar and embossing on 3 sides and extreme tubular pontil mark, then we have a medium Lockport green 5in by 2.75in by 1.25in with applied sloping collar, embossing only on the front, and a strong tubular open pontil, next is a very scarce two tone Emerald green GW with the same features as the last one mentioned (I dug this myself in an 1850s privy pit in upstate NY!) has a chipped lip unfortunately. the last bottle has the same features as the first mentioned except it is 1/3in shorter and the color is a pronounced teal/aqua with just a hint of green in it and this one has an extremely pronounced graphite pontil scar (Also a dug bottle!) I'll post better pictures this evening if anyone is interested :)

ND_IXL
02-13-2015, 08:32 AM
All of the G.W are sparkling *MINT* examples except the yellow/emerald green one with a chipped lip (otherwise mint)

RED Matthews
02-13-2015, 09:09 PM
NICE OLD BOTTLE. i smile when I look at the bottoms of bottles like this because of the corners of the bottom are so thin. This is because the parison didn;t have enough glass to fill in the corners when the glass was blown out to these corners. It is called "Heal Tap" because that is all it would take to break the glass and loose the contents. The bottle seems to show some texture in the glass. Interesting - because there are a lot of different glass textures caused by a lot of different things. RED M.

RED Matthews
05-01-2015, 03:12 PM
"Well I was just fooling around today and ended up back on this thread. The thing that gives these old bottles the whittle look, wasn't because they used a knife in the mole making. The molds were made of cast iron at this time; and the cavity had to be machined after the parting face and outside top and bottom of the mold were machined. The mold had to have a locking face on the insede surfaces. On a small bottle like this it was usually a vertical tongue and groove. On larger molds it was a dovetail locking by having the top of the tongue wider than the bottle cavity. The cavities of early molds were not always cast against a cold iron piece of the cavity form. This was done to chill the cast iron in the objective cavity in the mold halves. This chilling of the molten metal created a different graphite structure, called dendritic iron. The dendrites were linear lines of graphite progressing back in the iron, away from the cavity. This structure slowed the thermal conductivity of the heat and kept the mold hotter to accomplish a more uniform clear flat bottle contact surface. The so called whittle was a dumb name for variable thickness of the blown glass. I worked in Thatcher Glass's Central Mold Shop, and researched and made a lot of different developments in the 15 years I was there.The people in my management line taught me a heck of a lot - that I will always appreciate. I even developed a metal formula change that let me leave there, and travel the worlds glass industry selling them on trying this metal, for better glass making and longer mold equipment life. It was all a great smile maker in my memories. RED Matthews

ND_IXL
05-01-2015, 03:22 PM
Wow! That was an amazing story Red, thanks for sharing it. Very interesting the way the glass exhibits variable thickness which causes the whittled apperence. Another thing I was wondering about Red, two of my books have this bottle listed as American from between 1840-1860. Is it possible that this bottle could have also been made in America?