Page 1 of 15 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 141
  1. #1
    Senior Member Bottle Master iggyworf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    S.E. Michigan
    Posts
    1,785

    stretched or not..7up

    What do any of you think about this one. Looks to be 1946 on bottom. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Old-and-Unus...gAAOSwf-VWXUGa

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    iggy / Rich Those types of bottles were used to pre-measure syrup. I don't know the whole story as to how they were used, but I have seen them with other brand names on the base, including Coca Cola and others. It would be interesting to know more about them. [attachment=7up syrup Bottle.jpg] [attachment=7up syrup Bottle Base 1946.jpg]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails e46d8d3d13ff4344ad3227b7af187bca.jpg   99ee95926ffd47c8bf51a53915db5519.jpg  

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    Coca Cola http://www.collectorsweekly.com/stor...la-test-bottle ? [attachment=Coca Cola Syrup Bo... wooden sleeve.jpg] [attachment=Coca Cola Syrup Bo...ve over bottle.jpg]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dfee22f379db45399428ea606a0982cd.jpg   295f29b2afa9464b9845a7055a2259ae.jpg  

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    The key words appear to be "syrup test"
    COCA-COLA" SYRUP TEST BOTTLE 9-3/4 TALL

    These bottles were used to test the amount of syrup going into the COKE bottles on the production line. These are all different sizes depending the amount of soda and high of bottles being tested. I believe that this size was used to test a 12 oz. bottle.


    http://www.ebay.com/itm/COCA-COLA-SY...p2047675.l2557

    [attachment=Coca Cola Syrup Test Bottle.jpg]



    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bfc58ee9153441b7b7d5efd3348e3ed9.jpg  

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    I like this explanation best ... They would send these syrup test bottles down the line at certain intervals to assure proper (within specs) filling of syrup for cost and quality control. The wooden sleeve served as a spacer so the syrup tester bottle would stand up properly with the bottles being filled for production.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    By the way ... The eBay 7up syrup test bottle that iggy posted a link to is the only 7up version of these types of bottles I can find and suspect they are quite rare, especially with a date mark on them, with this being a 1946 Owens-Illinois. About 95% of these syrup bottles I've seen are Coca Cola related. So if you are a 7up collector, I'd try and nab this one, which closes in four days. The opening bid is $10.00 but with no bids yet.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    This collector seems to know a thing or two about syrup test bottles. Here's his [edited for clarity] description about the Pepsi Cola example pictured ... ~ * ~ Pepsi Cola Lab Premix Test Bottle with Rare Wooden Sleeve ...
    "During the early years of Pepsi Cola and Coca Cola it was critical to keep their formulas secret, but the technology was a little more primitive. The bottling companies needed to produce soda in sufficient quantities, which resulted in the bulk shipment of Pepsi Cola and Coca Cola as a syrup. This is why you see so many of the 5 gallon Pepsi Cola syrup cans for sale. It is also the reason you see so many of the 5 and 10 gallon Coca Cola kegs.

    Once the syrup reached the bottling plant it was then mixed with proper proportions of carbonated water. Too little syrup and it would go flat and not taste right. Too much syrup and the bottles would foam over during production causing bottles to be 1/2 to 3/4th's full. In order to assure the mixture was correct, syrup sample bottles were run through the production line every half hour on the hour all day long during production.

    Most everyone has seen their share of these tall skinny bottles for sale, but they seldom see the wood sleeve that went with them so they could be properly aligned and filled. This one is the wood collar used by Pepsi Cola. I have owned a couple of the test bottles with Pepsi Cola written as an ACL label. I have also owned a couple of the Coca Cola bottles with the ACL labels. But I have only seen two or three of these wood sleeves for Coca Cola. This is the only wooden sleeve for a Pepsi Cola syrup test bottle that I have ever come across."

    [attachment=Pepsi Syrup Test B... wooden sleeve.jpg]

    [attachment=Pepsi Syrup Test B...en sleeve text.jpg]



    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 9a778c9bdbc44222a03df861744e988e.jpg   73a0371015a44bcf9a02a6fa33bee197.jpg  

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bottle Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Shreveport La.
    Posts
    985

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    Posted this one a while back. Thanks for the info Bob!????[attachment=image.jpg]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cd06fdaf56a84076b70842a6627d1ffb.jpg  

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bottle Master iggyworf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    S.E. Michigan
    Posts
    1,785

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    Yeah! Thanx Bob for all that. Goodman, that's a cool Kist example.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Bottle Master SODAPOPBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11,502

    Re: stretched or not..7up

    There might be more to those syrup test bottles than what some people claim. As the one collector stated, the test bottles were run through the filling process on a regular basis "every half-hour on the hour" to assure that the amount of syrup going into each bottle was accurate. But if that was the case, then how do we explain these patents for 'Syrup Measuring Devices' that were designed to function with the bottling process? The inventor's claims associated with these devices state they are accurate and reliable. So why run a sample bottle through the filling process if these measuring devices are accurate? Every one of those so called syrup test bottles I've seen are designed with a lip just like on a regular bottle which indicates they were able to be capped. Why cap them? Were these types of bottles also intended to test the capping machine? Or were they intended to be filled and capped in order to send them to a laboratory for some reason? Or possibly to send the test sample back to the parent company? There might be more to the test bottles than previously thought - but at the moment I'm not sure what that reason might be. Here is just a sampling of the numerous syrup measuring device patents I've seen ... 1. 19072. 1921 [attachment=Syrup Measuring De...(2) (698x1100).jpg] [attachment=Syrup Measuring De...(2) (728x1100).jpg]



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •