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Thread: Lake Erie #4

  1. #1
    Junior Member New Bottler
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    Lake Erie #4

    Anyone know what kind of bottle this is, and its age, or value? It is 6 1/2" tall, 1 3/4" in diameter at the base and 1 1/2" at the top
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Bottle Master Harry Pristis's Avatar
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    Condiment such as maraschino cherries, cocktail onions, etc.



  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Pristis View Post

    Condiment such as maraschino cherries, cocktail onions, etc.
    Thank you, do you happen to know the age of it?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    I found a similar bottle with olives in it once before , not sure of an exact age but its likely older than the 1920's

  5. #5
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    1910's-1920's.

  6. #6
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    The tall, narrow bottle represents a very common olive bottle style that appears to have originated in the very early 1900s - or possibly late 1890s - and was popular through at least the early 1930s. It was referred to by bottle makers as the "New York Style Olive," "Chicago Cylinder Olive," or more generically as "Footed Cylinder Olive" and came in many sizes (as many as 14 sizes!) from about 3 oz. to over 28 oz. (Illinois Glass Co. 1906; Kearns-Gorsuch 1916). The footed olive style is typified by being tall and narrow (4+ times taller than the diameter), having a slight though visibly flaring heel, and a distinct constriction ridge or shoulder at the subtle transition from the body to the neck. The finish was also usually a one part "flared" finish which was corked or utilized some type of cap though later ones (late 1920s to 1930s) had external screw threads and other types of finish/closure combinations were also utilized occasionally (Kearns-Gorsuch 1916).
    This style first seems to have appeared as a late mouth-blown item although machine-made examples are much more commonly encountered and likely first occurred around 1905. This wide mouth style is a type most easily adapted to the new semi-automatic machines that were becoming increasingly common in the early 1900s (Illinois Glass Co. 1903, 1906). The footed olive appears to have continued into at least the early 1930s, though seem to be uncommon after that time as other more straight, uninterrupted sided (with no shoulder constriction ridge) styles became more popular (Fairmount Glass ca. 1930; Lucas County Bottle Co. ca. 1940s).


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by illyJ View Post
    The tall, narrow bottle represents a very common olive bottle style that appears to have originated in the very early 1900s - or possibly late 1890s - and was popular through at least the early 1930s. It was referred to by bottle makers as the "New York Style Olive," "Chicago Cylinder Olive," or more generically as "Footed Cylinder Olive" and came in many sizes (as many as 14 sizes!) from about 3 oz. to over 28 oz. (Illinois Glass Co. 1906; Kearns-Gorsuch 1916). The footed olive style is typified by being tall and narrow (4+ times taller than the diameter), having a slight though visibly flaring heel, and a distinct constriction ridge or shoulder at the subtle transition from the body to the neck. The finish was also usually a one part "flared" finish which was corked or utilized some type of cap though later ones (late 1920s to 1930s) had external screw threads and other types of finish/closure combinations were also utilized occasionally (Kearns-Gorsuch 1916).
    This style first seems to have appeared as a late mouth-blown item although machine-made examples are much more commonly encountered and likely first occurred around 1905. This wide mouth style is a type most easily adapted to the new semi-automatic machines that were becoming increasingly common in the early 1900s (Illinois Glass Co. 1903, 1906). The footed olive appears to have continued into at least the early 1930s, though seem to be uncommon after that time as other more straight, uninterrupted sided (with no shoulder constriction ridge) styles became more popular (Fairmount Glass ca. 1930; Lucas County Bottle Co. ca. 1940s).

    That is great information, thank you!

  8. #8
    Junior Member New Bottler Augusta GA's Avatar
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    Mystery solved. I have one that is 7 1/4 inches. Has 5015 1/2 embossed on the heel. 10 on the bottom. Good to know what it is...
    Last edited by Augusta GA; 04-30-2018 at 08:48 PM.

  9. #9
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    Definitely an olive bottle, I'd say early 1900's There seems to be a hint of "purple" to from Sun Colored Amethyst (SCA)



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