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  1. #1
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    The Red Cross Drug Store - Brockville Ont druggist bottle

    this was another one of the bottles I found at the Toronto bottle show , had got busy and forgot to post it . for some reason it kind of intrigued me at the time and figured it was worth taking home


    don't really know a lot about it , the seller was from Brockville and assume he found it there at some point as he had a number of other bottles from that area . he wrote on the back that it was run by an E.J Williams 1900-1911 and not exactly sure how its linked to the "red cross " organization


    tried to take a few different pictures of it , no markings on it other than embossing on the front

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  2. #2
    Hello I believe the Red Cross to be a trade mark product line like Rexall, Owl Drugs, Wallgreens etc. There were Red Cross drug stores and that was the store brand of what ever was in the bottle. Still a common practice today. As far as the name probably the drug store owner and available on the public records. Nice little embossed bottle.
    Last edited by KSESTATE; 06-14-2018 at 08:36 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    Nice bottle! Druggists simply adopted "Red Cross" as an authoritative and familiar trade name for their pharmacies. There was no formal affiliation with the health organization. In fact, under the 1909 federal act to incorporate the Canadian Red Cross Society, the use of the term "Red Cross" by any party other than the Red Cross Society was banned. I'm sure there was some overlapping between the banning in 1909 and when druggists changed their store names, their bottle embossings, their label printings, etc. Still, by the early 1910s, very few "Red Cross" drugstores were operating under such a trade name in Canada.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by mctaggart67 View Post
    Nice bottle! Druggists simply adopted "Red Cross" as an authoritative and familiar trade name for their pharmacies. There was no formal affiliation with the health organization. In fact, under the 1909 federal act to incorporate the Canadian Red Cross Society, the use of the term "Red Cross" by any party other than the Red Cross Society was banned. I'm sure there was some overlapping between the banning in 1909 and when druggists changed their store names, their bottle embossings, their label printings, etc. Still, by the early 1910s, very few "Red Cross" drugstores were operating under such a trade name in Canada.
    some interesting information , the 1909 ban would make sense as the seller though the bottle was from just before that date

    I didn't really know a lot about this bottle when I bought it , just though it seemed unique and interesting



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