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  1. #1

    Question Mineral removal/cleaning

    Hello all.... Can someone advise on cleaning jars and vases? How to I remove mineral scale etc when I can't get my hand in jar? I have tried SO many things and still have that milky white film! Thank you in advance. I want my items to look as nice as all of yours!

    Thank you ! Fun site, my in-laws would have LOVED it here!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bottle Master Spirit Bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Muskegon, Michigan
    Posts
    4,021
    Short answer: the containers have to be professionally "tumbled".

    Detailed answer:

    Experimental Data
    In my time of experimenting, I would use inside the bottle:
    wire brushes: staining remained.
    sulphuric acid: staining remained, one bottle ended up exploding as it overheated and I set it down on a porcelain surface (temperature difference).
    sand/"grit" in Bar Keeper's Friend and water: staining remained.
    other, less volatile cleaning compounds, even mixed: staining remained, toxic gases produced.

    Why does the staining remain?
    Answer: decomposition of the glass, leaching out silicates into the surrounding environment (contents, burial, water), opens up spaces in the glass for environmental contaminates to move in. Thus, the glass is, basically, fosilised. One mineral moves out, another moves in. It is permanent.

    ​Successful Methods of Removing "Mineralisation"
    To remove this staining is to remove the surface layer of the glass. Sanding and heavy polishing can be used, but to get inside the best way to do it is "tumbling" in cutting/polishing compounds with copper pellets. This is expensive but effective, so it is only good for those with monetary means and for the best bottles.

    Problems with Tumbling
    It does come with a risk of breakage, so you have to consider the element of danger. Good bottles should be handled only by people with experience. Embossing becomes less pronounced-- tumbling removes details. Most tumbled bottles look too clean and perfect to be true, for it removes the natural character of the glass. I don't like it. Other people tumble everything.

    So, that is the detailed answer. We do have a section for cleaning bottles.
    Have I not commanded thee? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest.

    Joshua chapter 1, verse 9.

  3. #3
    Member New Bottler
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Connellsville, PA
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit Bear View Post
    Short answer: the containers have to be professionally "tumbled".

    Detailed answer:

    Experimental Data
    In my time of experimenting, I would use inside the bottle:
    wire brushes: staining remained.
    sulphuric acid: staining remained, one bottle ended up exploding as it overheated and I set it down on a porcelain surface (temperature difference).
    sand/"grit" in Bar Keeper's Friend and water: staining remained.
    other, less volatile cleaning compounds, even mixed: staining remained, toxic gases produced.

    Why does the staining remain?
    Answer: decomposition of the glass, leaching out silicates into the surrounding environment (contents, burial, water), opens up spaces in the glass for environmental contaminates to move in. Thus, the glass is, basically, fosilised. One mineral moves out, another moves in. It is permanent.

    ​Successful Methods of Removing "Mineralisation"
    To remove this staining is to remove the surface layer of the glass. Sanding and heavy polishing can be used, but to get inside the best way to do it is "tumbling" in cutting/polishing compounds with copper pellets. This is expensive but effective, so it is only good for those with monetary means and for the best bottles.

    Problems with Tumbling
    It does come with a risk of breakage, so you have to consider the element of danger. Good bottles should be handled only by people with experience. Embossing becomes less pronounced-- tumbling removes details. Most tumbled bottles look too clean and perfect to be true, for it removes the natural character of the glass. I don't like it. Other people tumble everything.

    So, that is the detailed answer. We do have a section for cleaning bottles.
    Also worth mentioning is tumbling can weaken the embossed areas of the glass to the point that it breaks in that section. I had this happen when cleaning a small milk bottle before. Fortunately it wasn't a big loss but it taught me to be more careful.

  4. #4
    Junior Member New Bottler
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    25
    try using denture cleaner. I find it works best if I let it soak for 24 hours.
    Jerry



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