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  1. #1

    Question Having trouble identifying these bottles, stoneware and pontiled decanter

    Hello, long time reader, hunter but first time posting for help. I own an antique store and specialize in bottles. Due to my location we've been getting a lot of black glass and European stoneware. I personally collect early American stuff. I've been setting aside some stuff that I was having trouble identifying. I'm hoping someone has some info on these pieces. I'm hoping they are early American. I'll make another post like this with another group of bottles I'm having trouble with soon. Happy hunting and Thanks in advance!
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  2. #2
    Adding some info-- the amber soda is early. It has a drippy applied top. The whole thing is whittled and has a gigantic bubble that's not exposed anywhere. I looks like stoddard glass. The black galss intrigued me beside I couldn't find anything on the net and I don't want anything to slip by. The stoneware has very basic colors and I can't find any mojelica like it. It would be a very illegal American piece of the flora and natural colors line up. The decanter... super crude pontil, thin glass with pot stones and awesome twist in the stopper, acid etching is crude but pretty good shape overall. The decanter has some lower stopper chips and The stoneware was temporarily repaired by me. I watched a guy break it at a yardsale!...

  3. #3
    Because * very colorful american piece of the flora***

  4. #4
    BBC or a BB2 with a dot on the honey amber soda/beer

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bottle Master
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Hi and welcome to the forum! I'm afraid I've got some bad news for you though. The ceramic vase looks like "Talavera" pottery. Unfortunately, it does not look like genuine Talavera pottery of the antique variety so much as the kitschy post-1980s variety. The decanter may have some age to it but I really doubt it's anywhere close to old enough to qualify as Early American - I'm no expert on that sort of thing though. The two crown top bottles are certainly not early American because crown tops were only invented in the 1890s. Those also aren't American at all - my guess is either European or maybe East Asian, thus the crude design. The rest of the world continued using older techniques much longer than the States did while still adopting modern closures, resulting in some seemingly anachronistic bottles like yours.

  6. #6
    Would East Asian bottles have BB2 and B20 on the base?

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bottle Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    2,020
    the amber mineral water bottles are most likely English . 1900s to 1910s.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bottle Master
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    1,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Bretteves1 View Post
    Would East Asian bottles have BB2 and B20 on the base?
    It depends. They would put European letters on their bottles sometimes. But that was why my first guess was European. Otherwise they look very similar to the Chinese bottles I used to find on the West Coast.



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