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  1. #1

    A couple of Quanah, Texas druggist bottles

    Hi all, just wanted to share these. Dug up years ago in the Quanah dump.

    RAMSEY & MARRS
    DRUGGISTS
    QUANAH, TEX.

    YOUR DRUGGIST
    E.B. CASKEY
    QUANAH, TEX.

    Thanks for looking!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_9553.JPG   IMG_9561.JPG  

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    Nice ones! I really like that backwards Q, I can't remember seeing another backwards letter on a pharmacy bottle before, usually they seemed to be pretty good about quality control on those.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bottle Master sandchip's Avatar
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    I've seen backwards letters, but never the letter "Q". Those are some very nice Texas pharmacy bottles, 109. Here's one of mine that some of you may've already seen, with a backwards "N". "Chemists" is an archaic term for pharmacists and druggists.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #4
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    Wow, that's one absolute beauty of a bottle! I don't think I've seen that one on here before. Alabama isn't a state I normally associate with early pontilled bottles.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bottle Master sandchip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianBottles View Post
    Wow, that's one absolute beauty of a bottle! I don't think I've seen that one on here before. Alabama isn't a state I normally associate with early pontilled bottles.
    Thanks much and I hope BF109 will forgive me for throwing it on. And not to change the direction of his thread, but for anyone's benefit that might be interested, there are a few, all extremely rare pontils from Alabama. Mine is probably the most common, with no more than 7 examples, all varying to some degree in color, lip finish, etc. The aqua IP Talledega Sulfur Water: one known. The black IP gallon Bailey Springs Water, Florence, Ala.: one known. The emerald green IP Saunders Compound Syrup of Styllingia...Mobile: 2 known. And you're right in your thinking because Alabama was such a poor agricultural state at that time with little commerce and industry.

  6. #6
    Member New Bottler
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    Nice bottles!!! Didn't the have to carve it into a wood mold? Wouldn't you have to carve it backwards for it to come out. Any way it would be difficult to do? Best ch

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bottle Master sandchip's Avatar
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    I agree that it would have to be difficult either way to cut any lettering or decoration into a mold, but iron molds were used in most commercial bottle production. Wood will work for the short term, but will not hold up the the repeated impact of the molten glass over a long period of time.

  8. #8
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    So did they ever use wood, early on?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bottle Master sandchip's Avatar
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    Yessir, from time to time.

  10. #10
    Thanks guys! I've got a few more i'm going to post soon. Sandchip, that is one nice bottle you got there!



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