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  1. #1

    Large Amber Display Bottle

    I need help identifying this bottle. No label on the bottle, no markings or mold seam on the base, seams run up both sides and stop before the lip. The top of the bottle looks like it was sheared off. Any info about the bottle is much appreciated.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1230181736~2.jpg   1230181736a~2.jpg   1230181906.jpg   1230182125b~2.jpg   1230182125c~2.jpg  


  2. #2
    Senior Member Bottle Master Harry Pristis's Avatar
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    What a strange lip. The rim appears to have extensive de-corking damage which has been ground to improve appearance.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    Is it necessarily de-corking damage, or could it be something that was left rough with a specialized metal cap overtop of it? That part suggests to me that it's something which was not originally meant to be exposed like that. Everything about this bottle is strange, I have no idea what to think about it. Never seen anything like it. I'm having a hard time even guessing an age. The manufacture looks turn of the 20th century, but the design otherwise looks like something from the 60s.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bottle Master Harry Pristis's Avatar
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    Those dings are conchoidal fractures, or what's left of them after grinding the surface. Those fractures occur when prying out a cork. They don't occur with this frequency or this pattern in bottle finishing. Ground lips are common (canning jars, for example), but these lips are touched to a wheel which produces a more-or-less flat, rough rim. The grinding on this lip follows the contours of the lip chips, and may have been done with a rotary tool.

    Grinding lip chips was a more common practice in years past, but not so much these days. Resin repairs are more common these days, I think. With this bottle, I don't think the grinding improved its appearance.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bottle Master
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    Looks like a whiskey display bottle-the tops of these are usually ground like that and have a cover of some sort (they were just for advertising displays and contained no liquid). How tall it is? They are usually 14-20" tall. The ones I have seen are usually post-Prohibition even though they are often hand blown.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bottle Finder
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    Very nice. It's like an art-deco whiskey bottle!

  7. #7
    The bottle stands over 24" tall and weighs around 9lbs.



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