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Thread: full Pint flask

  1. #1
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    full Pint flask

    Hi there, I have a friend that just picked up this bottle. Itís turned a nice purple hue. It has what looks like a slug plate with full pint embossed on it. It also has a relatively sloppy applied lip. Any historical info on this bottle would be much appreciated.
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  2. #2
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    Made in large numbers in quite a few glass houses. 1880s thru early 1900s.

    Jim G

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    Thanks Jim! So would this be of American or European descent? Would it have held whiskey or any variety of spirits?

  4. #4
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    This would be American or possibly Canadian, definitely not European. Whiskey is likely but could have held all sorts of things. The "Full Pint" in a slug plate is unusual, I don't remember ever seeing one like that before.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bottle Master Robby Raccoon's Avatar
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    The Gould Act of 1913 required all bottles or labels of bottles to be listed with the volume the bottle would, not just could, hold. Most bottles that tell the volume of the contents date after this Act.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianBottles View Post
    This would be American or possibly Canadian, definitely not European. Whiskey is likely but could have held all sorts of things. The "Full Pint" in a slug plate is unusual, I don't remember ever seeing one like that before.

    Agreed. Most of the ones you routinely see have the full pint around the shoulder.

    Most of these bottles that I see are pre-abm type manufacture so I wonder how many were made before the Gould act and how many were made after simply using older equipment.

    Jim G

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bottle Master Robby Raccoon's Avatar
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    While numerous examples were likely made before the Gould Act, it is not cost-effective to needlesly engrave multiple plates or moulds for a utilitarian bottle meant for a catalog that any bottler with a tight budget might select from. Many bottles before 1910 were full ABM just as many bottles into and after WW1 in America were, like this, made by being BIM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robby Raccoon View Post
    The Gould Act of 1913 required all bottles or labels of bottles to be listed with the volume the bottle would, not just could, hold. Most bottles that tell the volume of the contents date after this Act.
    I was reading from the book - A Century of Antique Canadian Glass Fruit Jars” by Douglas and Marion Bird, and Charles Corke. Published 1971. - where is stated the use of manganese dioxide is why the jars would turn an amethyst colour after being exposed to sunlight over a long period of time. The use of manganese dioxide was discontinued in 1914.

    Would that date this jar between 1913 (Gould Act of 1913) and 1914 (discontinued use of manganese dioxide)?

  9. #9
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    Gould Act doesn't necessarily apply since you're in Canada, I'm not sure when rules about embossing contents came into effect here but I'm pretty certain it was much later than 1913, probably sometime in the late 1920s or 1930s. Manganese dioxide also wasn't completely discontinued in 1914, I've got a jar with a patent date of 1915 that's turning amethyst. Your bottle definitely shouldn't post-date the 1910s though.

  10. #10
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    Good points CB and I guess a lot of glassware info is not necessarily a hard and fast rule ��



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