A very different crock jug found at a estate sale

Len

CT LEN
Hey ROBBYBOBBY64, Wildcat Wrangling Kat, Buriedtreasuretime, et al,

Yo! RB-Regarding your question about lids. (When you're lucky enough to have them...)
I have a small collection of chamber pots. I took a quick look at the circumference of a few lids. They generally match the lower bowl pretty well. A couple had lids that were under a 1/8" of an overhang. Issue yet to be decided;)...

Hey Wildcat Wrangling Kat- I believe your Meemaw was one hot Granny and way too cool for this school! That is a great American story about her firing the outhouse. Two seaters were fairly common. There is an old colonial in Wethersfield, CT, the Silas Deane house, that has an original five, maybe six seater! If your Grandparents' property is still in the family, consider putting digging their privy on your bucket list.:)...

Hi Bud buriedtreasuretime- Yup, old cow milking barns sure were hard on clothes and especially footwear.
The gals always wanted the inner nest to be their pristine area. From the dairy men I've encountered, they look upon the bottles and cans, among other farm artifacts, symbols of their proud family labor. They are historic artifacts sharing connections to the earth, animals, and local communities. It doesn't get much better. Just sad to see the small dairy farms disappear in recent decades:confused:. Ending on a better note, I'd bet you passed on your interest in bottles to your next generation...

CT Len
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
Hey ROBBYBOBBY64, Wildcat Wrangling Kat, Buriedtreasuretime, et al,

Yo! RB-Regarding your question about lids. (When you're lucky enough to have them...)
I have a small collection of chamber pots. I took a quick look at the circumference of a few lids. They generally match the lower bowl pretty well. A couple had lids that were under a 1/8" of an overhang. Issue yet to be decided;)...

Hey Wildcat Wrangling Kat- I believe your Meemaw was one hot Granny and way too cool for this school! That is a great American story about her firing the outhouse. Two seaters were fairly common. There is an old colonial in Wethersfield, CT, the Silas Deane house, that has an original five, maybe six seater! If your Grandparents' property is still in the family, consider putting digging their privy on your bucket list.:)...

Hi Bud buriedtreasuretime- Yup, old cow milking barns sure were hard on clothes and especially footwear.
The gals always wanted the inner nest to be their pristine area. From the dairy men I've encountered, they look upon the bottles and cans, among other farm artifacts, symbols of their proud family labor. They are historic artifacts sharing connections to the earth, animals, and local communities. It doesn't get much better. Just sad to see the small dairy farms disappear in recent decades:confused:. Ending on a better note, I'd bet you passed on your interest in bottles to your next generation...

CT Len

Oh, I’ve tried to but they’re not much in to it, california cities were dug a long time ago and I don’t get to the country much. When we lived up in rural northern Nevada we were always finding a new place to dig-hense buried treasure time. I’m a collector like my grand pop and I love my old glass bottles. This group has helped me to pay more attention to my bottles because although I’m not into selling, others are and I learn from their knowledge about particular bottles. Thanks for asking .


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Cokecounty21

Active Member
He made them in Alabama, Texas, and his brother made them in Texas and Mississippi. A couple went to the land in Alabama where one of their shops had been and picked up every broken piece of everything they could find and I emailed them offering to buy just a broken piece and they said no. To find any piece broken or not would mean so much. My other GGG grandfather made tombstones that have some really different folk art than most tombstones. I live close to a lot of the cemeteries where I get to see his work. It’s cool to see it and know my GGG grandfather did that! I love collecting because I love the history that the pieces tell ! As you can probably guess I collect more than just bottles! Thank you for your reply and offer that if you ever run across a rushton piece of pottery you will keep me in mind! Thanks!
 

Len

CT LEN
Hey Coke County 21!

You are a chip off the old gravestone all right! I think its great that our generation of Americans are digging into their family's histories and making sure that their contributions are preserved.
Did GGG#2 ever sign his tombstones? Not uncommon for colonial carvers up here around New England to do it. (Yup, I had an active interest in tombstones, etc. too.) If you haven't already, take pics of GGG #2's work and record what yard its in. Share it with friends/relatives and before you cash in your chips let the library/historical society duplicate everything for future learners. Chances are you'll find that GGG#2 was in demand and that he traveled to service the needs of all the reasonably reachable communities to supplement his first line occupation.
...Now, regarding GGG#1, if you have a lot of shards, you might want to rebuild one of his pots/jugs etc. Just get yourself a box (at least about cat tray size) with low sides. Put in a couple of inches of sand and place the shards nearby where you can see and reach them. Then the puzzle fun starts. Make sure you use a glue that bonds ceramic. Chances are you aren't going to completely finish one but you might be surprised how far you get. If you can, do all this in a space that you can leave undisturbed and go back to in free time. More importantly, I'd get over to his old property that the couple you mentioned visited. Get permission and get digging. Hopefully the property still hasn't been disturbed below the surface. If the area is large and you want to do it right, go to the local college's archaeology dept and put in a request for help. They'll bring manpower and a lot of expertise. I'll wager you'll find a lot more than pottery, including your own chapter of the family history. Good luck.
--CT Len
 

Wildcat Wrangling Kat

Well-Known Member
He made them in Alabama, Texas, and his brother made them in Texas and Mississippi. A couple went to the land in Alabama where one of their shops had been and picked up every broken piece of everything they could find and I emailed them offering to buy just a broken piece and they said no. To find any piece broken or not would mean so much. My other GGG grandfather made tombstones that have some really different folk art than most tombstones. I live close to a lot of the cemeteries where I get to see his work. It’s cool to see it and know my GGG grandfather did that! I love collecting because I love the history that the pieces tell ! As you can probably guess I collect more than just bottles! Thank you for your reply and offer that if you ever run across a rushton piece of pottery you will keep me in mind! Thanks!

Me too.... (now I think they call us hoarders, maybe? (But I hoard really neat things, I swear?!)That is so cool about the headstones . There is SO much infamous history around this area. (Black Bart?) And some really old cemeteries.... it’s fun just to go out there and read them. Maybe you should think about putting a visit to Bodie Nevada on the ol bucket list.... talk about wanting to dig around, but don’t do it... i took 1 square nail back to return it, there. The Bodie curse, I wasn’t taking chances with. But the undertakers place was both fascinating and chilling. And the cemetery was crazy. Town prostitutes that should have been buried on the hill with the Indians and Chinese, back in the day. Lottie pulled some strings and secretly ended up with the white people.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Len

CT LEN
Hi Wildcat Wrangling Kat.

Never made it to NV. Consider it on my bucket list. Thanks for the warning about the Bodie Curse.--If you want to watch a great one season ghost investigation tv program that included active Chinese miners, there was one about, oh, three-four(?) years ago called something like "Ghost Mine." Two tech savy investigators help modern miners try to re-profit an old mine. You'll learn a lot and your belief system might just be sufficiently challenged:D. BTW, did Lottie have a last name or a.k.a.? Thx. --CT Len
 

Cokecounty21

Active Member
Thank yo
Hey Coke County 21!

You are a chip off the old gravestone all right! I think its great that our generation of Americans are digging into their family's histories and making sure that their contributions are preserved.
Did GGG#2 ever sign his tombstones? Not uncommon for colonial carvers up here around New England to do it. (Yup, I had an active interest in tombstones, etc. too.) If you haven't already, take pics of GGG #2's work and record what yard its in. Share it with friends/relatives and before you cash in your chips let the library/historical society duplicate everything for future learners. Chances are you'll find that GGG#2 was in demand and that he traveled to service the needs of all the reasonably reachable communities to supplement his first line occupation.
...Now, regarding GGG#1, if you have a lot of shards, you might want to rebuild one of his pots/jugs etc. Just get yourself a box (at least about cat tray size) with low sides. Put in a couple of inches of sand and place the shards nearby where you can see and reach them. Then the puzzle fun starts. Make sure you use a glue that bonds ceramic. Chances are you aren't going to completely finish one but you might be surprised how far you get. If you can, do all this in a space that you can leave undisturbed and go back to in free time. More importantly, I'd get over to his old property that the couple you mentioned visited. Get permission and get digging. Hopefully the property still hasn't been disturbed below the surface. If the area is large and you want to do it right, go to the local college's archaeology dept and put in a request for help. They'll bring manpower and a lot of expertise. I'll wager you'll find a lot more than pottery, including your own chapter of the family history. Good luck.
--CT Len
[/
 

Cokecounty21

Active Member
Hey Coke County 21!

You are a chip off the old gravestone all right! I think its great that our generation of Americans are digging into their family's histories and making sure that their contributions are preserved.
Did GGG#2 ever sign his tombstones? Not uncommon for colonial carvers up here around New England to do it. (Yup, I had an active interest in tombstones, etc. too.) If you haven't already, take pics of GGG #2's work and record what yard its in. Share it with friends/relatives and before you cash in your chips let the library/historical society duplicate everything for future learners. Chances are you'll find that GGG#2 was in demand and that he traveled to service the needs of all the reasonably reachable communities to supplement his first line occupation.
...Now, regarding GGG#1, if you have a lot of shards, you might want to rebuild one of his pots/jugs etc. Just get yourself a box (at least about cat tray size) with low sides. Put in a couple of inches of sand and place the shards nearby where you can see and reach them. Then the puzzle fun starts. Make sure you use a glue that bonds ceramic. Chances are you aren't going to completely finish one but you might be surprised how far you get. If you can, do all this in a space that you can leave undisturbed and go back to in free time. More importantly, I'd get over to his old property that the couple you mentioned visited. Get permission and get digging. Hopefully the property still hasn't been disturbed below the surface. If the area is large and you want to do it right, go to the local college's archaeology dept and put in a request for help. They'll bring manpower and a lot of expertise. I'll wager you'll find a lot more than pottery, including your own chapter of the family history. Good luck.
--CT Len
Thank you for your input and kind words ! Here are some examples of my other grandfather’s tombstone work
 

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