Welcome to our Antique Bottles Community

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Antique Bottle Community on the Web.

Register Log in

A very different crock jug found at a estate sale

Cokecounty21

Active Member
Dec 3, 2020
29
13
Oh and I am a board member on a cemetery preservation commission for the county I live in here in Alabama and I have found and transcribed many lost graves and cemeteries in which had been totally lost to time and Mother Nature! I love the history of it and the importance of preservation of these old cemeteries! Last week someone actually dug up an old grave at a cemetery in a part of the county that is very rural. I mean completely dug him up!
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2009
134
28
He made them in Alabama, Texas, and his brother made them in Texas and Mississippi. A couple went to the land in Alabama where one of their shops had been and picked up every broken piece of everything they could find and I emailed them offering to buy just a broken piece and they said no. To find any piece broken or not would mean so much. My other GGG grandfather made tombstones that have some really different folk art than most tombstones. I live close to a lot of the cemeteries where I get to see his work. It’s cool to see it and know my GGG grandfather did that! I love collecting because I love the history that the pieces tell ! As you can probably guess I collect more than just bottles! Thank you for your reply and offer that if you ever run across a rushton piece of pottery you will keep me in mind! Thanks!
One of my pastimes is taking a walk in an OLD grave yard we’re it’s all tombstones, not those horrid lawn plaques. The tombstones of yore were amazing pieces of art, hand cut and decorated from all kinds of stone. My sister passed in 2011 in Whyoming and she wanted to be buried there with a tomb stone. The damn thing was an embarrassing laser cut piece of ugly rock. I was so disappointed to see it. I found her a single plot in the pioneer old cemetery and a proper tomb stone would have been so fitting with all the other monuments so beautifully made. Times have changed. I’m glad you stil can go see your ggd’s handi work. Stone carving was a real art. I’ve been told that the best stone carvers were the Italian.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Len

CT LEN
Nov 14, 2020
70
18
Hi All, esp. Cokecounty21 and buriedtreasuretime,

Before I forget, I'm sure you've already heard, multiple permissions are required to dig somebody up. I realize its v.rural there but whoever did that is looking for grave goods(theft), skull/bones(black arts), revenge, or a combination. If you haven't already, report it to the authorities both state and local. A short piece in the area papers just mentioning the discovery will have a short deterrent effect if the first recommendation doesn't get you any action. Don't be afraid to go higher too. If we ever get together remind me to tell you a few stories on such topics. Most important--never forget that you wouldn't want the rest of your family+ friends disturbed in such a manner. BTW, Those game cameras that are motioned activated might help getting enough evidence for catching the bad guy(s). They're fairly cheap now Mr. County Cemetery Board member(congrats)--what you cherish, you must protect...

Ok, some quick thoughts on your photos. GGG's icons are very consistent: hearts, crosses, and animals mostly. The Weeping Willow and hand pointing heavenward were big from the 1830s-end of the century, esp. in the South. My fav is C. Jackson's stone with the animal at the top. (What is that? Hard to see on the computer.) One thing I noticed, GGG corrects any carving errors afterwards. Kudos. There are few that do. GGG seems sometimes to make use of local stone, even tools on occasion, which helps all around, but I don't see any signed stones in the shots you posted. Not his thing perhaps. I hope you consider continuing your interest a little further by joining a regional/national gravestone organisation. They often have workshops on cleaning stones, resetting them, etc. Clearly, graveyards need help and there is too little and too few to assist. Be somebody that makes that difference when possible.

Mr. Buriedtreasuretime,

Yup, those Italian-Americans make more than just good pizza and pasta! In the Old World, some of those old Roman roads and aquaducts are still being used. I have a vowel at the end of my name and I can say just about all the males in my extended family worked with their hands one way or another for a good part of their lives. However, your story of what you did for your Sister blew me away. (St. Peter will pat you on the back and your Sis will be there to greet you when its your time.) Lasers may have their uses, but I'm sure she agrees 100% in what you did for her. Wow! A great expression of pure love. Nice job sir! ...Also, before I forget, its true that we're pretty good with a shotgun. Now excuse me while I go out and plant those peppers and tomatoes. :)

Two Aces in my book. --CT Len
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2009
134
28
Me too.... (now I think they call us hoarders, maybe? (But I hoard really neat things, I swear?!)That is so cool about the headstones . There is SO much infamous history around this area. (Black Bart?) And some really old cemeteries.... it’s fun just to go out there and read them. Maybe you should think about putting a visit to Bodie Nevada on the ol bucket list.... talk about wanting to dig around, but don’t do it... i took 1 square nail back to return it, there. The Bodie curse, I wasn’t taking chances with. But the undertakers place was both fascinating and chilling. And the cemetery was crazy. Town prostitutes that should have been buried on the hill with the Indians and Chinese, back in the day. Lottie pulled some strings and secretly ended up with the white people.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
We all like to think our hoarding is just cool stuff. But when you come across that box that says “ strings too small to save” Thank the gods and goddesses for people like us that preserve the collectibles and oddities. Hopefully they to some day will find a new and dedicated caretaker too. Besides, lots of things to look at and ponder enriches your life as long as it doesn’t suffocate you. Good to watch those “hoarder” programs on Discovery and such channels, we learn a lot about our habits and why we do what we do. Knowledge is a very important gift to give your self.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2009
134
28
Hi All, esp. Cokecounty21 and buriedtreasuretime,

Before I forget, I'm sure you've already heard, multiple permissions are required to dig somebody up. I realize its v.rural there but whoever did that is looking for grave goods(theft), skull/bones(black arts), revenge, or a combination. If you haven't already, report it to the authorities both state and local. A short piece in the area papers just mentioning the discovery will have a short deterrent effect if the first recommendation doesn't get you any action. Don't be afraid to go higher too. If we ever get together remind me to tell you a few stories on such topics. Most important--never forget that you wouldn't want the rest of your family+ friends disturbed in such a manner. BTW, Those game cameras that are motioned activated might help getting enough evidence for catching the bad guy(s). They're fairly cheap now Mr. County Cemetery Board member(congrats)--what you cherish, you must protect...

Ok, some quick thoughts on your photos. GGG's icons are very consistent: hearts, crosses, and animals mostly. The Weeping Willow and hand pointing heavenward were big from the 1830s-end of the century, esp. in the South. My fav is C. Jackson's stone with the animal at the top. (What is that? Hard to see on the computer.) One thing I noticed, GGG corrects any carving errors afterwards. Kudos. There are few that do. GGG seems sometimes to make use of local stone, even tools on occasion, which helps all around, but I don't see any signed stones in the shots you posted. Not his thing perhaps. I hope you consider continuing your interest a little further by joining a regional/national gravestone organisation. They often have workshops on cleaning stones, resetting them, etc. Clearly, graveyards need help and there is too little and too few to assist. Be somebody that makes that difference when possible.

Mr. Buriedtreasuretime,

Yup, those Italian-Americans make more than just good pizza and pasta! In the Old World, some of those old Roman roads and aquaducts are still being used. I have a vowel at the end of my name and I can say just about all the males in my extended family worked with their hands one way or another for a good part of their lives. However, your story of what you did for your Sister blew me away. (St. Peter will pat you on the back and your Sis will be there to greet you when its your time.) Lasers may have their uses, but I'm sure she agrees 100% in what you did for her. Wow! A great expression of pure love. Nice job sir! ...Also, before I forget, its true that we're pretty good with a shotgun. Now excuse me while I go out and plant those peppers and tomatoes. :)

Two Aces in my book. --CT Len
Hers another tombstone fail story: when my mother and dad died in 2008 & 2010 I needed to do a stone for the concrete grave cover in an old rural cemetery in Nevada. The cemetery is mostly beautiful old stones and monuments, most grave sites have curbs or full concrete “lids”. My parents and brother are next to my grandparents and aunt and uncle. So big family plot. So in Winnemucca Nv. They now plant grass and water said grass with well water highly mineralized with alkali . They today won’t allow a stone unless it’s a plaque. The funeral director let me design my family plot stone / low curb plaque, which was a black basalt 6 foot long by 14” wide by 8” thick with a hewed edge of in matte basalt all the way around. Because it would be atop the concrete grave, it would not impact the lawn mowing requirement. I don’t live there so upon returning to NV to see the stone and approve it before setting it was placed upon the grave top for me to approve. It was a most beautiful and unusual marker monument( it cost $6000.00 to fabricate and deliver). The carving was crisp, I had my brothers name as well as my parents and my sisters and mine put on it for a later time( sister passed the following year). So, the director communicated that they would set the stone in two days and since I was up there getting my dads house on the market I had time. I go out to the cemetery two days later and find this beautiful stone with its remarkable hewn edge buried flush in a bad “cut in”to the concrete and concreted in. It’s like flushing $6k down the toilet. Funeral director said “rules are rules” and it impacts the mowing to not be flush.. And upon return in subsequent years- the beautiful black basalt is as white as the concrete top from the alkali well water watered on all the graves. There’s something about a lasting beautifully done marker that if one is lucky, gets ones name mentioned aloud by people walking the cemetery and admiring the monuments. Plaquesno one takes the time to push away the grass or read them. Forgotten sadly forever.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Len

CT LEN
Nov 14, 2020
70
18
Hi buriedtreasuretime,

Not to be forgotten by me. If I'm ever near Winnemucca* I'm going to pay my respects. Never been there but I'll probably hit Vegas or Reno one day and will let you know. I don't know how populated this yard where your family is and probably in a small yard could find the family circle by the info previously given. Your last name (if a large yard) would make it easier. In any case, you should think about dictating you and your family's story too. Its very interesting. If only you do it for the kids/future generations and leave a copy in the hometown library. Stay Well.
--CT Len
*- Going to get a map out after.
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2009
134
28
Hi buriedtreasuretime,

Not to be forgotten by me. If I'm ever near Winnemucca* I'm going to pay my respects. Never been there but I'll probably hit Vegas or Reno one day and will let you know. I don't know how populated this yard where your family is and probably in a small yard could find the family circle by the info previously given. Your last name (if a large yard) would make it easier. In any case, you should think about dictating you and your family's story too. Its very interesting. If only you do it for the kids/future generations and leave a copy in the hometown library. Stay Well.
--CT Len
*- Going to get a map out after.
Thank you for that suggestion. I sure might just do that. Enjoy the spring today.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Len

CT LEN
Nov 14, 2020
70
18
I found Winnemucca on the map. NW corner area. Now I just have to get to NV. Stay well and get that tape recorder going on all your stories. The library might have already started such a project for people who contributed/lived in town. Like the buriedtreasuretime family! --CT Len
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2009
134
28
Hi buriedtreasuretime,

Not to be forgotten by me. If I'm ever near Winnemucca* I'm going to pay my respects. Never been there but I'll probably hit Vegas or Reno one day and will let you know. I don't know how populated this yard where your family is and probably in a small yard could find the family circle by the info previously given. Your last name (if a large yard) would make it easier. In any case, you should think about dictating you and your family's story too. Its very interesting. If only you do it for the kids/future generations and leave a copy in the hometown library. Stay Well.
--CT Len
*- Going to get a map out after.
Thanks Len, some great old ghost towns around that area, Humboldt and Pershing counties.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Staff online

Members online

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
78,660
Messages
711,537
Members
20,013
Latest member
TrashMaster
Top