An idea for displaying special / interesting bottle and glass shards

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DavidW

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Maybe someone has posted this before, but I just thought this would be worth passing along. I thought it would be a neat idea to display a small collection of shards ("better" shards that are too nice to throw away) such as part of a bottle in a scarce color, or with attractive embossing that you consider interesting for one reason or other, mounted in one of those glass-topped display cases that are often used to display Indian artifacts like arrowheads, or jewelry or coins. I mean the ones that are flat, rectangular and are only about 2 to 3 inches or so in thickness. There might be a few show up in this keyword search: https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2334524.m570.l1313&_nkw=display+case++arrowheads&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&_odkw=display+case++for+coins+or+artifacts&_osacat=0

I don't have one of those cases right now, but it seems like with a thin layer of cotton, styrofoam, felt or something of that nature, and placing the shards in a nice arrangement, maybe with some kind of "color scheme" would be a great way to keep and display them. I am sure some of the diggers have found "criers" that were too good to leave, even though they were broken, or maybe only a small part of the piece was found. Of course this would only work for small shards, maybe less than two or three inches in size. And pieces of glass that are more "flat" rather than curved.
 

willong

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My own idea for displaying shards was to incorporate them in an epoxy casting to use as a table top. If one had access to a pottery kiln even the curved pieces could be flattened first by heating until the glass slumped, though that would presumably distort embossing to some degree.
 

Len

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Doubles as a coffee table conversation starter as well as an art piece. :cool:
 

Len

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Yes, I'm sure you could sell them as such. Expand on the thought long enough you'll be quitting your day job, forming your own co., and appearing on Shark Tank. Btw, in your expanding inventory don't forget the line of slightly smaller wall art hangers. :)
 

Huntindog

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They are call Riker cases and come in all sorts of sizes.
 

Mayhem

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Why not go for something more interesting that you don't see every day like an antique glass dome display. See attached.

Here is a wonderful mid-19th century glass lot, complete with 3 GREAT flasks and 1 MINT utility bottle, and the corresponding shard/ relics that were excavated from the Granite Glass Company in Mill Village, Stoddard New Hampshire. This factory was in operations from 1846 until the late 1850s.

The quart size flask is a GII-78 EAGLE / EAGLE in a gorgeous light amber color. The impression is strong and with little to no wear this is a top shelf example. Two-piece mold, open pontil scarred base, sheared and refired mouth.

The pint sized flask is a GII-84 EAGLE / EAGLE in a very nice OLIVE amber color. The olive tones are somewhat scarce in Stoddard glass, which was primarily amber. The impression is EXCELLENT, and there is very little to no wear. The glass luster is also quite nice, and condition is perfect! It would be difficult to find a better example. Two-piece mold, open pontil scarred base, sheared and refired mouth.

The 1/2 pint sized flask is a GII-88 EAGLE/ EAGLE in a rich amber color. Also, impression is very strong, and little to no high point wear. All of the details of the patriotic eagle are well-defined, and the glass has a wonderful "pebbly" texture to it. Nice clean glass luster. The tiniest 1/8" onion skin bubble, otherwise perfect as well. Two-piece mold, open pontil scarred base, sheared and refired mouth. Another outstanding example.

The small thin flared lip medicine / utility bottle may have held ink, spices or medicine. Cylindrical form, and perfect flared lip! Old amber glass, but also nice luster/ clarity. Two-piece mold, open pontil scarred base. Perfect example!

Each of these fine specimens is accompanied by an "excavated" glass shard from the factory site. All of these items have much more significance when they are put into context, and these "historical" shards are great go-with items. They tell the story... and create wonderful conversation.
 

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Len

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Hey Mayhem,

You are 1000% correct and then some! I may have to tell Great Grandpa's hanging pocket watch to make room. Great idea and you have my vote for Oceanside Town Historian.
Btw, is that you distracting drivers and causing minor accidents on those tv insurance commericals? I love those! :cool:

P.S.- ...Its hard not to like anything Stoddard! :)
 

Len

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They are call Riker cases and come in all sorts of sizes.
One must be WILLing to work hard on those. I'll have to make it a NUMBER 1 priority after ENGAGING in some New Orleans Jazz with a Redhead friend first. Say, have you ever seen the various RIKER bottles that came out of NYC's turn of the century soft drink establishment? I believe it had the longest bar in NY State and ladies felt perfectly safe in there, etc. :) Thanks for the name info, Huntindog.
 

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