Ancient muffin? No, this is serious.

TxBottleDigger

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I found this probably a year ago less than a foot underground. I still don’t know what it is. Could this be dried paint? That’s scary because you know what it contains. I have had this laying on my floor for awhile. Anything to get concerned about. What is this? Diameter around 2 inches. Very small for a paint can but still possible. Mildly heavy, strong, and compacted.
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TxBottleDigger

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IT IS ! Jeez, hope it’s from 1978 and newer. The dump went from the early 50s to the 80s. This was back when I was digging the trashy dump on my own property full of asbestos panels. Though it was wet most of the time. I’m so stupid. Thankfully I don’t dig in junky stuff like that anymore. Asbestos tiles hold paint exceptionally well, the old house that once stood had asbestos siding but lost a majority in it’s last decade. So maybe they painted where it had lost siding? It also seems a very dull white too. Lead increases the pigment dramatically to extremely bright colors. Also, LEAD PAINT NEVER LOOSES PIGMENT. This looks to be slightly faded. I threw this thing out the back door. Maybe I should lead check this. I think it’s pretty cool and worth keeping if negative. Seriously man, I can’t deal with 20th century greediness anymore. Lead and asbestos was already found to be dangerous in the 1890s ! And it was almost 100 years until it would be banned. Companies don’t care about your health. They want the almighty dollar. If it weren’t for safety regulations, WE’D STILL HAVE DANGEROUS PRODUCTS EVERYWHERE!
 
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ROBBYBOBBY64

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Looks like Hardtack...lol!! No really, It looks like paint that has dried out in a tin that has long rusted away?
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My dig group found something similar, except it weighs about 60 pounds. We think it's old cement left to dry in an iron bucket that has since gone.
 

TxBottleDigger

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Looks like Hardtack...lol!! No really, It looks like paint that has dried out in a tin that has long rusted away?
ROBBYBOBBY64.
I really have wanted to try hardtack. Isn’t it bad for your teeth though? Along with other weird survival foods, I also have heard of “tree bacon”. Basically you cut thin slices of the juicy side of a tree and fry them. Apparently, trees can be found throughout the United States with slices out of them. This is the remnants of Native Americans eating tree bacon. That’s definitely the case of it being dried paint. The dump is right by a large pond and I’m sure the humidity & Texas sun quickly got to a small, thin, paint can.
 

TxBottleDigger

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My dig group found something similar, except it weighs about 60 pounds. We think it's old cement left to dry in an iron bucket that has since gone.
It’s actually quite interesting what totally rusted away things can leave. I have seen voids in old dumps that are from the space a old can once was at.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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I really have wanted to try hardtack. Isn’t it bad for your teeth though? Along with other weird survival foods, I also have heard of “tree bacon”. Basically you cut thin slices of the juicy side of a tree and fry them. Apparently, trees can be found throughout the United States with slices out of them. This is the remnants of Native Americans eating tree bacon. That’s definitely the case of it being dried paint. The dump is right by a large pond and I’m sure the humidity & Texas sun quickly got to a small, thin, paint can.
I think they soaked Hardtack in liquid like a coffee. Ever hear of pemmican? Last 6-12 months at room temperature. Real survival food.
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ROBBYBOBBY64

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I doubt it made it any more pleasing to eat it. Still hard as Hell.
Hardtack was called by many names. Cabin bread, pilot bread, sea bread, ships biscuit, sea biscuit, dog biscuit, soda crackers, my favorite names were molar breakers, tooth dullers, armor plates and worm castles. Worms were just more protein! Kept you from starving.
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willong

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Hardtack was called by many names. Cabin bread, pilot bread, sea bread, ships biscuit, sea biscuit, dog biscuit, soda crackers, my favorite names were molar breakers, tooth dullers, armor plates and worm castles. Worms were just more protein! Kept you from starving.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
I used to eat a fair amount of pilot bread, and also Knäckebröd (a crunchy rye cracker or wafer) when they were more affordable and I got out backpacking more often. Unlike sandwich bread, they both weighed less, took up less space and didn't mush into a doughy ball in a pack pocket. I'm sure the rye crackers were more nutritious than white bread and suspect the pilot bread was also.
 

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