Welcome to our Antique Bottles Community

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Antique Bottle Community on the Web.

Register Log in

Best bottle brush for cleaning the inside of bottles?

Coca-Cola

Member
Oct 5, 2019
18
3
Just wondering what the best bottle brush is for cleaning the inside of bottles out is? I bought one at the store and it is too big to fit through the neck of the bottle. I assume you would also want one soft enough to not abrade the inside? Any advice is appreciated!
 

Harry Pristis

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2003
1,019
63
Northcentral Florida
You can use just about any cleaning product (except Whink) to clean a bottle. Hydrochloric (muriatic) acid will not harm the glass. LimeAway is commonly used if you have limey deposits or iron deposits. If the glass is "sick," that is, decomposing, no cleaning product will remove the sickness.

What I have found generally useful is laundry bleach.

I fill a bottle with tepid tap-water to which I add a tiny amount of laundry detergent (because it is non-sudsing) and a dollup of laundry bleach. I let it soak for a few hours.

Whatever residue is left I remove with a home-made brush. I use a stiff wire coat-hanger for this purpose. I cut the hook portion away. I bend the smallest possible loop on one end of the wine and a large loop on the other. The larger loop will be the handle.
bottlebrush.jpg
bottlebrush.jpg

I cut a lengthwise strip of scrubbing pad (a Scotch-Brite knockoff from the dollar store) wide enough to generously cover the small loop. I roll the strip of scrubbing pad around the small loop and secure it tightly with several wraps of thin copper wire. String or a rubber band could be substituted for the copper wire. The copper is too soft to scratch the glass, but is relatively impervious to chemicals.

If you wish to use a commercial bottle brush, try this. I affix a small patch (about the size of the brush diameter) of scrubbing pad to the tip of the brush using polyurethane cement (Plumbers Goop, Shoe Goop, etc.). This patch not only makes the brush more effective in corners and at the bottom of the bottle, it also cushions the tip of the wire brush from any "hammer effect" in manipulating the brush inside the bottle.
 

embe

Well-Known Member
Jul 14, 2019
284
43
Yeah, some of the older medicine bottles etc have pretty small openings.
 

Dogo

DOGO
Apr 8, 2020
107
28
Central NJ
You will need a variety of brushes to clean a variety of bottles. I got my best results by soaking in a strong mixture of warm (when mixed) water and TSP. Let them stand for up to a week. The chopped copper is the safest cleaner if you can find a way to turn or tumble them.
 

JarDoctor

Member
Sep 16, 2004
20
3
Just wondering what the best bottle brush is for cleaning the inside of bottles out is? I bought one at the store and it is too big to fit through the neck of the bottle. I assume you would also want one soft enough to not abrade the inside? Any advice is appreciated!
The best brush for sodas is one Jar Doctor sells number B170 for $5.00. It is 14" long and the brush is 4" long - it is bendable to get in to corners, and shoulders. Our most popular for bottles especially sodas.
B170.jpg
 

Roney

New Member
Sep 20, 2020
1
3
Just wondering what the best bottle brush is for cleaning the inside of bottles out is? I bought one at the store and it is too big to fit through the neck of the bottle. I assume you would also want one soft enough to not abrade the inside? Any advice is appreciated!
I use coarse sand with a little water and maybe just a drop of dishwashing liquid. Just shake vigorously.
 

martyfoley

Well-Known Member
Sep 24, 2019
208
43
I use coarse sand with a little water and maybe just a drop of dishwashing liquid. Just shake vigorously.
:)I used gravel (or coarse sand) back in the 70s. I took the bigger stones out of the gravel. Put about 3 tablespoons of gravel into the bottle, a drop of dishwashing liquid, and filled the bottle with water about 1/3 of the way, and shook the hell out of it with my thumb over the open top. It got 99.9% of the residue out. Of course if the glass is stained from minerals in the soil this will not remove the stain as its in the glass. On eBay you can buy brushes that come in various sizes on a ring which may be very helpful for only about $12.
 

bne74honda

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2004
620
18
Guelph, Ontario, Canada
In my experience the best method is using copper wire, about 1/8 in dia and cut into pieces about 1/4 long. Cut with wire cutters produces a bit of an edge on the ends and these find the tight corners of the glass quite well. Depending on the size of bottle - and I have used this method on the smallest and largest - place enough copper in the bottle to cover the bottom and add a cleanser of yer choice. Shake gently, rotating to cover all surfaces. This will get just about anything off the glass. I generally use CLR. I find brushes never get all surfaces and the copper bites thru the toughest goo. For larger bottles and heavier stains, I'd double the amount of copper. I've used this with bottles so small only one or two pieces of copper would fit. The cut copper will generally last for 30+ washings before it simply wears down.
 

Members online

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
76,547
Messages
696,277
Members
18,287
Latest member
MichaelM77
Top