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Best bottle cleaning tool. (DIY)

mytauntaunsbeat

Active Member
Nov 20, 2019
40
18
Millville Pennsylvania
Did you use the CLR? I never was able to scratch a bottle. I think you may have bought a cheaper copper scrubby. Use a magnet to see if it is just copper coated steel. That may be. Can you get a picture of it? If so please post. Sorry for the confusion. You can get copper wool From fine to coarse online it is not cheap. Even copper bb's are steel inside and copper coated. Hope it was not valuable.
i think i found the proper scrubber now so going to get that rigged back up and try again. I did use CLR though maybe not enough. The bottle i tried wasnt anything special so no big damage or loss
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
1,451
113
New Jersey
WARNING! Do not use this method on codd bottles. The spinning dowel can all too easily trap the marble against the side of the bottle. You can only guess what happens next! I broke a common codd doing this method 10 years ago. I never forgot or did that again. No biggie! ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

Timberwolf70

Active Member
Apr 5, 2020
40
8
Stainless steel might scratch. On the Rockwell scale, brass and copper is softer than glass. I use Cerium Oxide. That is what glass houses use to polish their glass.
Ok thanks... I haven't run into anything (yet) that needed that much cleaning/polishing anyways
 

Harry Pristis

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2003
986
43
Northcentral Florida
Stainless steel might scratch. On the Rockwell scale, brass and copper is softer than glass. I use Cerium Oxide. That is what glass houses use to polish their glass.
Does the cerium oxide reduce the "sickness" (etching) at all? I think that the C.O. is the final stage in tumble-polishing a bottle. Have you tried a more aggressive grit for sick glass?
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
1,451
113
New Jersey
Does the cerium oxide reduce the "sickness" (etching) at all? I think that the C.O. is the final stage in tumble-polishing a bottle. Have you tried a more aggressive grit for sick glass?
Oxidation is crystals. Each crystal, depending on the metal it forms on, produces a different uniform sized crystal. Each type of oxide or crystal is a different grit. Grit has a number which ranges from coarse (low number) to polish (high number). Used from low to high grit in order to remove scratches produced by the last grit used. Lite sickness can be removed with a polishing grit (7000-20,000 grit). Heavy sickness needs a medium grit (600-1000 grit) that grinds a very thin layer of material away. Then you can use a higher grit to polish the glass. Cerium is the final Polishing step in most glass houses. It has a grit of 1.3 -1.6 microns.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 
Last edited:

yacorie

Well-Known Member
Dec 10, 2018
336
28
CT
Another cheap thing you can do is use popcorn kernels. You can add them and shake around. Cheap and effective
 

Harry Pristis

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2003
986
43
Northcentral Florida
Oxidation is crystals. Each crystal, depending on the metal it forms on, produces a different uniform sized crystal. Each type of oxide or crystal is a different grit. Grit has a number which ranges from coarse (low number) to polish (high number). Used from low to high grit in order to remove scratches produced by the last grit used. Lite sickness can be removed with a polishing grit (7000-20,000 grit). Heavy sickness needs a medium grit (600-1000 grit) that grinds a very thin layer of material away. Then you can use a higher grit to polish the glass. Cerium is the final Polishing step in most glass houses. It has a grit of 1.3 -1.6 microns.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
I guess that's a "No, I haven't used a more aggressive grit with my copper mesh rotary tool."
 

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