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Bleach?

planeguy2

Well-Known Member
Apr 29, 2020
117
28
Can I submerge my bottles in bleach to clean them, or will that ruin the color? I don't see the harm in using bleach on a clear bottle but with other colors, I am not sure.
 

treeguyfred

Well-Known Member
Mar 9, 2013
371
43
Northern N.J.
Bleach is just not good for cleaning truly antique bottles. Always good to start with a room temp soak in dish soapy water and use a bottle brush. After rinsing and letting them dry you can then examine to see if they are clean enough to display and if you are satisfied then you're done. If more cleaning is needed then .... ask for advice on the particular stain or fouling that you are unhappy about. each different soiling fouling will usually require some-what different attention. But! I've never had good results from bleach.
~Fred
 

planeguy2

Well-Known Member
Apr 29, 2020
117
28
Bleach is just not good for cleaning truly antique bottles. Always good to start with a room temp soak in dish soapy water and use a bottle brush. After rinsing and letting them dry you can then examine to see if they are clean enough to display and if you are satisfied then you're done. If more cleaning is needed then .... ask for advice on the particular stain or fouling that you are unhappy about. each different soiling fouling will usually require some-what different attention. But! I've never had good results from bleach.
~Fred
I usually use a brush but I was just wondering.
 

treeguyfred

Well-Known Member
Mar 9, 2013
371
43
Northern N.J.
i have used "The Works" a strong toilet bowl liquid cleaner and aquarium gravel. I make a quantity and keep it in a lidded bucket in my basement- its pretty well ventilated. Before I bought the house I'm in I was always living in a rental so the cleaning bucket was kept outside (only in spring, summer and Fall). The measurements for the toilet bowl cleaner to water is an important issue (toilet cleaner needs the extra water to be of top efficacy) definitely ask for advice here before using advanced cleaning methods... I've been doing this a long time and have made plenty of mistakes that can help you NOT make same mistakes. (big grin)
~Fred
 

planeguy2

Well-Known Member
Apr 29, 2020
117
28
Cool I have both, but what do you use the gravel for, do you put it in and shake or what?
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
1,452
113
New Jersey
I use CLR (calcium, lime and rust remover). Bleach is an accident waiting to happen. Who has not in a rush used breach only to ruin a new pair of pants or favorite shirt, When i have garbage clothes on it never happens. I use crushed stone (stone dust) in the mix, fill the bottle halfway seal the top and shake like crazy. Be safe use goggles and if gloves. A good tip is to clean in a 5 gallon bucket. One drop in a sink, unless a plastic slop sink and you lost the bottle. Gloves covered in any cleaner are slippery and hard to hold on to anything especially a glass bottle. Hope this helps, ROBBYBOBBY64
 

treeguyfred

Well-Known Member
Mar 9, 2013
371
43
Northern N.J.
I have multiple sized black rubber corks that will fit most any sized bottle mouth and yes ~ just like Robby said gloves and a bucket or in my case a plastic slop sink. I fill the bottle in question about 1/3 full of my toilet bowl cleaner, and then pour in about an inch or two of aquarium gravel (natural rounded not the dyed sharp edged) push the appropriately sized cork in and while wearing my shit grubby diggin clothes and dishwashing/cleaning gloves, I swirl and shake and swirl backyards and forwards. I take a couple of breaks every few minutes or so and remember to breath while i'm doing this. I have a bucket of baking soda water to neutralize my cleaned bottle after pouring the aquarium gravel back into another container of regular clean tap water, then pour the toilet bowl cleaning solution back into its holding bucket.
~its really a science and will provide hand drawn pics and solution amounts to whom ever wants my method details... most of my insulators have been cleaned using the same solution as well but its definitely a different procedure too.. the results are damn good, aside from the bottles that must get tumbled...
~Fred
 

Harry Pristis

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2003
986
43
Northcentral Florida
None of these caustic or acidic liquids will harm colored glass. Muriatic acid straight will not damage glass. Caution is appropriate to avoid harming yourself, not so much the bottle.

I have found over the years that a laundry bleach solution with a few drops of laundry (not dish) detergent is a very effective soak for dealing with organic remains like wine residue. I have even used laundry bleach to dissolve long-dead mice trapped in old demijohns.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
1,452
113
New Jersey
Muriatic Acid if used should always be next to a bucket of cold water mixed with baking soda. Put a couple of old wash rags in it. The baking soda will act as a neutralizer. Just in case you get any on you.
ROBBYBOBBY64
 

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