Cleaning out a shelf of stuff - should I throw these out?

bne74honda

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Wow! I hope you were joking. That was pretty harsh. You're probably right, but could have said it in a less obnoxious way...
Yeah...waaay too harsh. BUT, I feel the same way about bottles as I do books....do not trash them. If nothing else, take `them to Sally Anne or Goodwill.
 

American

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I agree. Don't throw them away. Do something good for the environment and put them in the recycle bin. They won't be worth anything in a thousand years.
If you use some perspective you might understand. The population of the US in 1776 was 3 million and hundreds of bottles were blown every day. The population of these machine made bottles was 130 million. Hundreds of MILLIONS of bottles were pressed out by electrified automatic bottle making machines a day. They are so common they have no value until their numbers are vastly reduced, which will be never. Why would you want to clog your shelf up with that?
Apparently you don't actually own anything historical.
 

American

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Wow! I hope you were joking. That was pretty harsh. You're probably right, but could have said it in a less obnoxious way...
I guess it sounds obnoxious, but I was trying to be realistic. You never really know how your tone is taken when you write something.
 

jompoo

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Thank you. Taking advice - placed them and others in a container with a note. If the kids want to throw them away, fine. I don't plan to throw them away. Thank all of you for your help.
 

bottles_inc

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If you use some perspective you might understand. The population of the US in 1776 was 3 million and hundreds of bottles were blown every day. The population of these machine made bottles was 130 million. Hundreds of MILLIONS of bottles were pressed out by electrified automatic bottle making machines a day. They are so common they have no value until their numbers are vastly reduced, which will be never. Why would you want to clog your shelf up with that?
Apparently you don't actually own anything historical.
Agree with American. Nothing special about these bottles. The historical value slick/common bottles from after 1900 could have is in the location they were put in by the original users. If they've been removed from there, sure they'll be interesting to someone someday, but there are so. Many. of them. Nothing wrong with liking/keeping/collecting thus sort of stuff, but you can't knock those of us who don't when we need to get rid of the massive quantities we turn up. I've got a 50 pound box full of 1910s-1930s slicks that I cannot for the life of me get rid of at a price of $0. It's hard enough to find non bottle people interested in common 1880s-1890s stuff. I'm already approaching hoarder territory with the amount of stuff i want I've got. It's going in recycling soon
 

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