Creek walking. Tips, tricks and LAWS

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SKS.TUSC

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Or up the game a notch and use a potato rake for the same purpose. Such a tool will enable raking through bottom sand and muck in likely deposit areas where the current back-eddies. Moreover, one can loft a found bottle to the surface in the crook of the tines.

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Very impressive thought, haha I have one when I dig into mounds, hills, soil areas etc... But haven't ever taking it creeking ...... until now lol
 

willong

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I don't get mistaken for a hiker much though. When I go out hunting I'm not wearing my best duds, seeing as how I'm usually covered in dirt on the way back. Why ruin nice clothes eh?
What? People go out hiking in fine clothing these days? Are they trying to revive Victorian aesthetics?

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willong

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Worst case, I end up with some interesting shards to add to my growing shard collection (not sure what I’m going to do with all of these glass pieces, but that’s a “problem” for another day
When that day comes, consider projects like stained glass windows or mosaics. One does not even have to become proficient with the traditional techniques of those crafts--embedding pieces in epoxy casting resin is much easier.

A coffee table, even one lit from below through a translucent plastic panel, is a project I've thought of but have never built for the meager collection of shards I have on hand. With a table that is essentially a glass-covered light-box, one would not even have to embed the pieces, could periodically rearrange the contents, and tell their guests "Yeah, you see all the criers from that last dig? I sure wish someone hadn't run a bulldozer through that site!"

(A light-box table should work well for other displaying other transparent and translucent items such as mineral thin sections and crystals, Autumn leaves, gem stones and especially beach glass. And with low cost, energy efficient LED illumination, should not cost too much to operate.)
 

RoseOnTheRocks

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When that day comes, consider projects like stained glass windows or mosaics. One does not even have to become proficient with the traditional techniques of those crafts--embedding pieces in epoxy casting resin is much easier.

A coffee table, even one lit from below through a translucent plastic panel, is a project I've thought of but have never built for the meager collection of shards I have on hand. With a table that is essentially a glass-covered light-box, one would not even have to embed the pieces, could periodically rearrange the contents, and tell their guests "Yeah, you see all the criers from that last dig? I sure wish someone hadn't run a bulldozer through that site!"

(A light-box table should work well for other displaying other transparent and translucent items such as mineral thin sections and crystals, Autumn leaves, gem stones and especially beach glass. And with low cost, energy efficient LED illumination, should not cost too much to operate.)
Great ideas! I actually have an idea in mind for a coffee table- possibly using my teals/blues as a river in the center, browns for the shore, greens for forest. Such a commitment though, and I'm loving your coffee table light-box idea a lot more! I'm seriously going to research this, thank you so much
 

willong

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Great ideas! I actually have an idea in mind for a coffee table- possibly using my teals/blues as a river in the center, browns for the shore, greens for forest. Such a commitment though, and I'm loving your coffee table light-box idea a lot more! I'm seriously going to research this, thank you so much
You are quite welcome. Glad my idea added oxygen to the spark.
If you develop your research into a commercially viable product, please consider a modest royalty for yours truly:).
 

Clayton J. Migl

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Well, basic trespassing isn’t illegal. What you need to look out for is “No trespassing” signs. Going onto property with one of those signs bumps it up to CRIMINAL TRESPASSING WHICH IS ILLEGAL AND PROSECUTABLE. Creeks are generally considered public property in the first place. Finding them? Google maps does fine. Do not walk creeks in rural areas. You’ll probably find 1950s trash at best. Look for the creeks that run through, or nearby a town.

Hope this helps,


Clayton J. Migl
 

Roy

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Well, basic trespassing isn’t illegal. What you need to look out for is “No trespassing” signs. Going onto property with one of those signs bumps it up to CRIMINAL TRESPASSING WHICH IS ILLEGAL AND PROSECUTABLE. Creeks are generally considered public property in the first place. Finding them? Google maps does fine. Do not walk creeks in rural areas. You’ll probably find 1950s trash at best. Look for the creeks that run through, or nearby a town.

Hope this helps,


Clayton J. Migl
Hi Clayton
In CT I'm told the No trespassing signs have to be signed by the landowner. If not signed by the landowner it will be considered simple trespassing, unless of course you are found in possession of something obviously belonging to the landowner. That changes things.
Roy
 

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