heatherb32

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Hello everyone,

I was just curious, does anyone know how the molds for antique bottles, in the late 1890s were made? How the molds themselves were made, not the bottles? Do you know if there was first a cast iron form of the bottle made to cast the mold or? Please any help would be greatly appreciated.

Heather
 
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heatherb32

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Thank you for trying to help me. The site that you listed helped a little. I have looked at that site before, and although it did mention the molds, it doesn't go into detail about how the plate mold itself was formed. See the reason that I am so curious about all of it, is because I purchased a metal cast iron, heavy bottle a few days ago from a flea market. It is the exact size and shape as the glass bottle that was made in the late 1890s. It even has the same words, it reads, "DR. DANIELS' COUGH, COLD, & FEVER DROPS BOSTON, MASS. U.S.A." It is very unusual. I will try and post a picture on here so you can see what I mean. I am just curious to know if maybe it was some sort of mold to make the plate mold or..? I don't know. Please any info would help me tremendously. Thank you.
 

nhpharm

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All of the bottle molds I have seen have been machined/hand cut. I don't think a casting could ever give you the smoothness and definition you would need, particularly on an embossed bottle. Would love to see the bottle! I've seen some cast iron bottles as part of advertising clocks and so forth, so maybe that is a possibility? A photo would help for sure.
 

heatherb32

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Hey sorry it took me so long to reply. Here is a few pics of that bottle.
 
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heatherb32

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SAM_3134.jpgSAM_3136.jpg
 

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Harry Pristis

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A glass bottle was used to make a mold in green sand. The bottle was removed, and molten aluminum (probably) was poured into the mold. You can find instructions on-line for doing this yourself.


 

nhpharm

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Heather indicated this was cast iron...that would be harder to do. Also was done with some skill to get the embossing to show up well. If it is cast iron I'm thinking it is old...maybe a paperweight or promotional piece? It also looks like it is hollow...which would be very difficult to make at home (unless it is just drilled out).
 

Harry Pristis

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First, let's agree that this casting has nothing to do with bottle-making or bottle mold making.

My assumption is that Heather wouldn't be able to distinguish between a block of iron and a block of aluminum. That assumption could be wrong, but casting iron is not a hobby pursuit, I think. Casting a HOLLOW bottle like this one would be very difficult . . . my assumption is that only the neck has a void.
 

heatherb32

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Thank you nhpharm for your comments and for your help. You have been very kind and a big help. :rolleyes:

As for Harrys comment, actually Harry, I do know how to distinguish between iron and aluminum thank you very much! I would have to be a moron to not know the difference! I had said that it is iron, and I was correct. Also it is completely hollow, not just the neck. So I don't know what to think about it. It is very odd and heavy. I don't know hopefully I have stumbled upon something great tho. I am very pleased that I saw it and picked it up, that is for sure. Please, nhpharm, if you happen to find anything out about what it could be, I would be so appreciative. Thanks again. :)
 

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