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Dead eye

seniorscuba1

Well-Known Member
Feb 24, 2020
59
18
Howdy, I found this dead eye on the back of an old brig that wrecked in a storm while trying to seek shelter behind a large island unfortunately the ship ran up on a reef and was completely destroyed . It happened in 1911 the ship was named the PetraDSCN0050.JPG
 

nhpharm

Well-Known Member
Apr 24, 2007
2,099
63
That same argument could be made for the bottles we dig...noting that the bottles we dig would survive for hundreds or thousands more years in the ground but the ocean will destroy most shallow wrecks very quickly. I know this is a sensitive topic, but removal of a wooden deadeye from a coastal wreck preserves that artifact and certainly won't decrease the enjoyment of the likely very few divers who visit this wreck.
 

PorkDaSnork

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2020
74
18
Georgian Bay, Ontario
That same argument could be made for the bottles we dig...noting that the bottles we dig would survive for hundreds or thousands more years in the ground but the ocean will destroy most shallow wrecks very quickly. I know this is a sensitive topic, but removal of a wooden deadeye from a coastal wreck preserves that artifact and certainly won't decrease the enjoyment of the likely very few divers who visit this wreck.
Bottles are dumped away... they were garbage. Shipwrecks are technically still property of the shipping company, and the “very few” divers who visit it will be certainly disappointed that the wreck will soon be stripped to some planking of the hull.
 

Drift

Well-Known Member
Dec 7, 2018
123
28
Peoria, IL
Is it better for a deadeye to rot in the ocean, or to be lovingly preserved and admired for a long time? We never would have seen this if OP didn't dive for it. I'm not trying to pick a fight! I definitely see the value on both sides of the debate.
 

PorkDaSnork

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2020
74
18
Georgian Bay, Ontario
Is it better for a deadeye to rot in the ocean, or to be lovingly preserved and admired for a long time? We never would have seen this if OP didn't dive for it. I'm not trying to pick a fight! I definitely see the value on both sides of the debate.
If a wreck is a century old and the deadeye still looks like that, I’m sure it’s fine just where it is. They also will dry out quickly and rot on land... unless you brush it with water and such every week.
 

Drift

Well-Known Member
Dec 7, 2018
123
28
Peoria, IL
What about access...very few people (relatively) are able, willing, and equipped to dive, but most people can admire images or visit a museum or somebody's collection. Could a civilian taking an object from a wreck occasionally be the best thing for the public, by making it more available to them?

Thanks for the reasoned response. I'll fully admit I'm going into this biased as a bottle digger, and I'm interested to learn more about shipwreck and artifact ethics. I tried selling a native celt recently. I need the money but it gave me the willies, so I took the ad down.
 
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