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did not expect to pull these!

Bohdan

Well-Known Member
Jan 14, 2019
75
8
Slocan Valley, BC
Because I found these on my private property, so they were technically already mine, I just didn’t know about them.

You shouldn’t be digging anywhere that isn’t your property, or if you have permission from the land owner. Most shipwrecks are historical sites, so unless you’re salvaging them legally, you have no right to take things from them. I’m probably not gonna keep them anyway... perhaps donate them to the Canadian War Museum.
So what are we doing here? We dig bottles and artifacts. Do you really think we should all just dig them up ... and then rebury them? Gimme a break! Some things in life just don't have a "politically correct" angle. GAWD!
 

Drift

Well-Known Member
Dec 7, 2018
126
28
Peoria, IL
Since I get mine from the bottom of a river, I recycle post-1930 slicks and fragments to keep people from stepping on the sharp edges. Happens a lot. I keep the rest.
How/where do you recycle antique glass or fragments? I've heard recycle plants can't do anything with old bottles, and especially broken pieces, and get irate about having to deal with them, so I've stopped recycling my slicks and try giving them away for free, but even that can take a while sometimes.
 

sandchip

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
4,969
113
Georgia
How/where do you recycle antique glass or fragments? I've heard recycle plants can't do anything with old bottles, and especially broken pieces, and get irate about having to deal with them, so I've stopped recycling my slicks and try giving them away for free, but even that can take a while sometimes.
There's a glassblowing shop associated with a local university not too far away from me. I'd try checking out something like that in your area. Most glasshouses love cullet and will probably be glad to take brokes and slicks off your hands.
 

FreeRangeAsparagus

Well-Known Member
Aug 10, 2019
80
18
Massachusetts, USA
There's a glassblowing shop associated with a local university not too far away from me. I'd try checking out something like that in your area. Most glasshouses love cullet and will probably be glad to take brokes and slicks off your hands.
I had the same thought, called a few glassblowing shops and the consensus among them is they won't take old glass because they have no way of knowing how it was made. A lot of it has different melting points and mixing them together apparently never goes well. They all turned me down, but I did find a solution.


How/where do you recycle antique glass or fragments? I've heard recycle plants can't do anything with old bottles, and especially broken pieces, and get irate about having to deal with them, so I've stopped recycling my slicks and try giving them away for free, but even that can take a while sometimes.
I did some research about recycling glass and it was really depressing at first, but I called my town and we are lucky enough that they actually put money into the recycling center. All our single-stream gets sent to a separate facility where they sort it out. The glass itself is crushed into minuscule fragments and used as a mix-in for asphalt when they build highways. It's not a perfect solution but by then the glass is so small and fine I feel okay about it being "back" in nature, not just as a bottle sitting in the landfill for the next 1000 years.
 

seniorscuba1

Well-Known Member
Feb 24, 2020
59
18
Because I found these on my private property, so they were technically already mine, I just didn’t know about them.

You shouldn’t be digging anywhere that isn’t your property, or if you have permission from the land owner. Most shipwrecks are historical sites, so unless you’re salvaging them legally, you have no right to take things from them. I’m probably not gonna keep them anyway... perhaps donate them to the Canadian War Museum.
hello One thing we find when diving around Halifax Harbor for 40 years is quite allot of old spent and live ammo, and don't be confused these things definitely safe just because they've been in the ground for 4 40 or 50 years ,doesn't mean when it gets warm they could go off. There is an ammunition ship new Halifax called the S.S Claire Lilley it struck a reef while trying to enter Halifax Harbor 1942 the Navy spent many years well into the 70s and 80s and later cleaning it up. I was driving in the wreck with my son who was newly certified When We Came Upon a rather large shell , we looked at it for a few minutes laying amongst the wreckage it had no Fuse on the top but other than that it was completely intact we got an idea how big it was and when I get back to the boat I realized this is no artillery shell is the bomb designed to be dropped from an aircraft. We obviously left it right where it was , the Navy did some more cleaning picked up a couple of these at the time they had spent 50 years underwater they took them out to a military test range wired it up ,filled the hole it was in with sandbags and boom I saw a video and the blast sent the sandbags straight up it was an explosion. the A/S mark 10 mortor if not made safe can be really dangerous . if you are going to keep them i suggest you have someone qualfied look at them and be sure they're safe
 

seniorscuba1

Well-Known Member
Feb 24, 2020
59
18
One of the thing just because some old veteran decides to take a couple of souvenirs home doesn't mean what he's taking his safe. A friend of mine was working at the Museum here in Halifax when two young guys brought an army Foot Locker into the museum it seems to grandfather passed away and it'll be nice to donate this stuff to the museum , so when they open the box to take an inventory of what was there they got the standard British Style World War II era tin hat , Canadian army uniform with various badges medals etc a few other bits and pieces and in the bottom of the Foot Locker two live mortar rounds it seems grandad brought them back from the war and they spent 40 years in the hot attic in the bottom of an army Locker my friend call them up and ask him if you left anything else they said no it was all in that box they were shocked when they learned about the live rounds. And I guess this was a common occurrence
 

PorkDaSnork

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2020
74
18
Georgian Bay, Ontario
So what are we doing here? We dig bottles and artifacts. Do you really think we should all just dig them up ... and then rebury them? Gimme a break! Some things in life just don't have a "politically correct" angle. GAWD!
For Pete’s sake you are missing the point. How many times I gotta say it? Removing artifacts from Shipwrecks is illegal. No ifs ands or buts. That’s all I’m saying.
 

PorkDaSnork

Well-Known Member
Jul 9, 2020
74
18
Georgian Bay, Ontario
The following is our exchange from the "Dead eye" thread:

exactly why you shouldn’t take them for yourself.

PorkDaSnork

What's chafing my rear end here, Saint Pork, is that you are making the pompous and incorrect blanket assumption, that my items were probably acquired illegally, or at the very least, unethically. Aside from my own land, everywhere I look is with written permission from the landowner, not only to cover myself, but to protect them from any liability in the event something should happen to me or my son while I am on their property. And I most definitely do not search historic sites, State, Federal or otherwise. I'd appreciate it if you'd save the self-righteous, moralistic lectures, at least until you know exactly what the hell you are talking about concerning the individual upon whom you are passing judgement.

What's almost amusing is that the item that came to mind that prompted my reply concerning value, is a pry bar about 5 ft. long that my grandfather made from a wagon axle during the Depression. To anybody else, it would be worth no more than scrap value, but to me, it's priceless, because both of my grandfathers died long before I was born and items like this are all I have of them. Exactly why I shouldn't take them for myself, huh? LOL.
You’re so stupid it’s beyond belief. The pry bar is YOUR property. It was never someone else’s. That’s sentimental value, and it’s kinda cool too. Dead eyes are not. I never ever said you dug without permission, I was assuming you DID ask permission, because thats my point. You wouldn’t dig on someone’s property without consent, right? So what makes it okay for people to salvage wrecks without permission? Here, I’ll even give you a couple things to read.
 

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