EARLIEST "CROWN TOP" SODA BOTTLES 1892 - 1900

SODABOB

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shotdwn

Thanks a lot - great observation!

I totally agree that the Kork-N-Seal caps were intended to be used after the bottle was opened and were not applied at bottling plants and/or breweries. My primary reason for posting them was to present them as a possible explanation as to why some bottles, such as the Willms and Graf bottles, have what appear to be dual-purpose finishes (Blob/Crown). Maybe the Blob/Crown bottles originally had a Cork/Wire closure, but were designed to also accommodate a Kork-N-Seal type of cap after they were opened. However, no matter how we slice it, without knowing exactly when certain bottles were made, all we can do is speculate about the dates. If we can determine some of those dates, it might solve the mystery. By the way, I do a LOT of speculating - which sometimes leads to other clues and/or answers, and sometimes it doesn't.

For example: Check out these two ads for Otto Huber beer. The first one was published in March of 1898 and only depicts blob bottles. The second one was published in December of 1898 and depicts blob AND crown bottles. Even though I'm speculating, I'll bet that 1898 was when Otto Huber switched from blobs to crowns. By the way, I'm currently researching Huber beer bottles to see what else I can find. If nothing else, there should be some fairly early Crowns that were used by them.

Otto Huber Brewery_Brooklyn_Life_New York_Sat__Mar_26__1898.jpg



Otto Huber Brewery_Brooklyn_Life_Sat__Dec_10__1898.jpg
 

SODABOB

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P.S.

I'm also wondering when these were made and used - and whether they were for blob or crown bottles? Or, maybe for both? I have seen quite a few of them - none of which had a wire attached to it. The upper part is porcelain.

Graf Cork Seal.jpg


Graf Cork .jpg


Graf Cork Variation.jpg
 

SODABOB

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I also found this today. Notice what it says about "England" - which supposedly is where the Crown finish originated before William Painter patented his cap in 1892

St. Louis Post Dispatch - December 13, 1894

Crown Bottles_St__Louis_Post_Dispatch_Missouri_Thu__Dec_13__1894.jpg
 

SODABOB

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Update ...

As far as I know, this F.H. Finley & Son bottle with 1894 embossed on it is still the earliest known Crown bottle. But, what I don't know is whether it is a soda bottle or a beer bottle. Notice in the article where it says "Val Blatz Milwaukee Beer." So far, this is the earliest article I have been able to find for F.H. Finley. Because the article says "Bottling" and not "Brewery" or "Brewing" it sounds like a soda bottling plant. However, also notice where it says "Bottlers Of" - which clearly suggest they bottled Blatz beer. Like so many other topics in this thread, this one needs some more research.

Especially notice the address on the bottle is the same address that's in the article.

F H Finley & Son 1894 Crown.jpg



The Washington Post, Washington D.C. ~ February 16, 1895 ~ 1206 D St. N.W.

F H Finley & Son's_The_Washington_Times_Washington DC_Sat__Feb_16__1895_.jpg
 

shotdwn

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shotdwn

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Update ...

As far as I know, this F.H. Finley & Son bottle with 1894 embossed on it is still the earliest known Crown bottle. But, what I don't know is whether it is a soda bottle or a beer bottle. Notice in the article where it says "Val Blatz Milwaukee Beer." So far, this is the earliest article I have been able to find for F.H. Finley. Because the article says "Bottling" and not "Brewery" or "Brewing" it sounds like a soda bottling plant. However, also notice where it says "Bottlers Of" - which clearly suggest they bottled Blatz beer. Like so many other topics in this thread, this one needs some more research.

Especially notice the address on the bottle is the same address that's in the article.

View attachment 212869


The Washington Post, Washington D.C. ~ February 16, 1895 ~ 1206 D St. N.W.

View attachment 212870
I agree with you on thinking this could be a soda bottle. I believe Blatz had their own embossed bottles with the Blatz name on them and I wouldn't think they would allow a bottler to bottle their beer in a bottle other than their own.
 

SODABOB

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News Flash!

Earliest "Crown Cork" Bottles

1893

I just found these - which is a year earlier than the 1894 F. H. Finley bottle - and a new earliest date. I found several bottles by these two brewers, including some blob-tops, but not a Crown that I can definitely say is from 1893. Please join the search and together we will make history - providing that someone can find one of these bottles that can definitively be dated to 1893

Meyer Beer - Wolters Brewing Company - Savannah, Georgia

The Atlanta Constitution - Atlanta, Georgia - April 30, 1893

Crown Cork Bottle_The_Atlanta_Constitution_Georgia_Sun__Apr_30__1893_.jpg




King's Beer - Joseph F. Higgins - Hartford, Connecticut

The Hartford Courant - Hartford, Connecticut - July 12, 1893

Crown Cork Bottle_Hartford_Courant_Connecticut_Wed__Jul_12__1893_.jpg
 

hemihampton

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Very Interesting, Nice Detective Work Bob. LEON.
 

SODABOB

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Thanks, Leon

The only progress I have made are the locations for the two breweries

King's = Boston, Mass
Meyer = Savannah, Georgia
 

UncleBruce

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I also found this today. Notice what it says about "England" - which supposedly is where the Crown finish originated before William Painter patented his cap in 1892

St. Louis Post Dispatch - December 13, 1894

View attachment 212868
I'm not sure how you glean from this ad that the crown "ORIGINATED" in England when it was 100% invented by Painter residing in the US. I think we can look at the ad as a reference to how quickly the CROWN came into use in England. Not that it originated there. The bottling industry was very strong in Europe and were always looking for an edge over competitors. I'm sure that this device being called a CROWN didn't hurt either with the strong presence of MONARCHY. In the US the lightning type closures were in vogue and WORKING just fine while the crown was looked on with suspicion due to the SIMPLICITY of the closure so it took longer for the US companies to come on board invention. The writer of the article may not have been aware of what was going on in the US closure market and only learned about this through some other venue. The closure wars were big money and I would say if a European entity had invented this, litigation would have quickly ensued. Litigation never happened. Instead of conjecture a good reference book is: SODA AND BEER BOTTLE CLOSURES by David Graci. He is the expert in the field of closures.
 

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