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English Black Glass or Dutch ?

daltonbottles

Well-Known Member
May 11, 2010
54
0
Just a quick heads-up if anyone is looking for the Van Den Bossche black glass book. Bargain on eBay item #200478867377. This is usually a $250 book. Hope this is appropriate here. Not my auction by the way.
 

earlyglass

Well-Known Member
Dec 21, 2004
1,053
0
Dalton, Thanks.

Steve, I am not sure what to make about your bottle... it would be good to see it in person. It is quite a large piece of glass!

I would really like to see this thread continue. I will be posting more artifacts from glasshouses over the next couple of days, and maybe we can keep the conversation rolling. It is all so very informative.

Mike
 

daltonbottles

Well-Known Member
May 11, 2010
54
0
No problem Mike. I would like to see this thread expand too, maybe get photos of various black glass showing material from all periods between the shaft and globe types on into the later 1870s mold blown black glass. I've always had a fascination with black glass, but there is surprisingly little information or discussion about it within bottle clubs, on the internet, or even in publication. I have found that there seems to be a lot of confusion about dating this stuff, when in reality, black glass is one of the easiest forms to put within specific type and date ranges. I'm constantly watching for certain pieces that I don't have represented in my collection, and some of the ones that you would think were common and simple to acquire can be surprisingly difficult. At present I'm trying to put together a representative grouping of all the major styles from the beginnings of black glass production circa 1630 to around 1875 when most black glass production appears to cease. It's really not that daunting a task, as there are relatively few individual "styles" involved, but I suppose it could be a major endeavor if you really tried to include all the "variations" from the norm.

DB
 

Steve/sewell

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2010
6,108
0
Thanks Rory,thats a great article.In 1983 I spent two weeks in Virginia with the final week in the Tidewater area Bush Gardens,Jamestown all the old plantations on the James River.When we were at Carters grove Plantation the rear of their property is the bank of the James river. On a small section a new fort and settlement had been discovered called Wolstenholme Towne.This was was a fortified settlement in the Virginia Colony begun with a population of about 40 settlers of the Virginia Company of London which was located about 7 miles downstream from Jamestown. Named for Sir John Wolstenholme, one of the investors, it was established about 1618 on a plantation named Martin's Hundred. Housing in Wolstenholme Towne consisted of rough cabins of wattle and daub woven on wooden posts thrust into the clay subsoil.

On March 22, 1622, the Native American Powhatans rose to kill as many English settlers as could be surprised in their homes and fields. From the fall line of the James River to Hampton Roads, they burned and looted settlements, killing an estimated 400 colonists.
Martin's Hundred, the plantation hardest hit, lost more than 50, perhaps as many as 70. Wolstenholme Towne's death toll was not separated in the death rolls. About 30 miles upriver on the south bank of the James, Sir Thomas Dale's new "citiy" (sic) of Henricus was also wiped out in what has come to be called the Indian Massacre of 1622.

In the 20th century, separate groups of archaeologists uncovered the sites of both Wolstenholme Towne and Henricus. The former is located on the grounds of Carter's Grove plantation in the Grove Community of southeastern James City County. The findings were chronicled by author and historian Ivor Noel Hume.
In December 2007, Carter's Grove was acquired from the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation by CNET founder Halsey Minor for $15.3 million. Per the press release the new owner "plans to use the mansion as a private residence and use the site as a center for a thoroughbred horse-breeding program."
Wolstenholme Towne is now considered one of the many lost towns of Virginia.

The day we were there it was pouring rain and we didnt know that the archaeologists were working the site.The workers were not there and there was a break in the rain abd my wife and I wanted to see the gardens on the property as they were supposed to be some of the best in the world.
We were not dissapointed because it was an enormous English garden probably 500 by 500 feet.After finishing walking the garden the sun popped out and we wanted to see the James river up close.There on the right about 150 feet from the banks of the river a full blown archaeological dig was under way.
The tiered layers of the dig were filled with water as days of rain flooded all of South Eastern Virginia.The entire area was roped off with crime scene safety tape.As we were leaving I spotted on the edge of their tape line of demarcation a piece of glass sticking out.It turned out to be a fully intact English mallet bottle which I took back to the museum house after thinking long and hard as to whether to keep it or not.My conscience wouldnt allow me to keep it.Later that same year a large story with plenty of pictures of the site and the artifacts found was in the National Geographic magazine.
 

baltbottles

Well-Known Member
Nov 25, 2002
2,392
0
Baltimore Maryland
Mike after going through all the City Directories here's the yeas Smith Is listed. The bottle is a bit later then most would suspect.

Chris

1829 Directory Smith J. L. M. wine merchant, cor. South & Water dw Fayette w of Charles

1831 Directory Smith J. L. M. wine merchant, 25 Water St; dw St.Paul's st s of Saratoga

1833-34 Directory Smith J. L. M. wine merchant, 25 Water St; dw 48 St.Paul's st s of Saratoga

1835-36 Directory Smith J. L. M. wine merchant, 25 South St

1837-38 Directory Smith J. L. M. wine merchant, 25 Water St. dw Saratoga st near Cortland

1842 Directory Smith J. L. M. importer of wines, 21 South St.
 

earlyglass

Well-Known Member
Dec 21, 2004
1,053
0
Chris, Thanks for doing that research. Yes, the bottle does look much older than that, I would have figured 15 years earlier! Given the length of time they were in business, you would think that there would be quite a few examples out there, however they rarely show up.

Were any glasshouses in the Baltimore area producing such wines during the 1830s??

Mike
 

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