Extremely odd find.

TxBottleDigger

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This is a Jamestown, North Dakota hutch I found today, but what is really strange, is that Jamestown, ND, is 1,000 + miles away from South Texas. I definitely have heard about bottles being hundreds of miles away from origin, but never expected to have that happen to me anytime soon. Very weird. I really don’t know what to think of this.
23179B07-589D-433F-9515-5C1A6F41A44F.jpeg
 

TxBottleDigger

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Yes, I know that, that’s the only feasible way. But...
AC5D7D86-0A8D-41B4-BE6A-1C979CE6D9C0.jpeg

Out of all the places, why was it sent to a rural town in Texas?
 

hemihampton

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I found a New Orleans Med or Druggist in Detroit a few Years ago. I thought that was odd?
 

CanadianBottles

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I suspect that another reason sodas would travel absurd distances is that bottlers would buy second hand bottles from other firms at a deep discount. I once found a shard of an embossed soda from Goderich, Ontario on Vancouver Island - that's over two thousand miles away, including a boat ride, and Goderich is a small town far from any major population centres or main passenger rail corridors. What was stranger, though, was that I had recently purchased an intact example of that same bottle from a local digger's dollar bin. I can't imagine that some obscure small town bottler was distributing soda that far away, and it seems unlikely for one person to have brought enough bottles on a trip for them to end up in at least two separate dumps, so the only conclusion I can think of is that one of the local bottlers had been using them.

Another more well-known example of this is Solo, which was briefly an unsuccessful 1940s Montreal brand and then became one of the most popular sodas in the Caribbean as an entirely unrelated beverage. The defunct company's bottles were sold to somebody in Trinidad, and the bottler there decided to keep the old branding. This new operation was so successful and the old bottles became so iconic that the modern plastic bottles are still obviously modeled after a 40s ACL.
1635136799415.png
 

Nickneff

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This is a Jamestown, North Dakota hutch I found today, but what is really strange, is that Jamestown, ND, is 1,000 + miles away from South Texas. I definitely have heard about bottles being hundreds of miles away from origin, but never expected to have that happen to me anytime soon. Very weird. I really don’t know what to think of this.
View attachment 231251
The Headless huch it is still cool you could always cut some of the top off and make it a drinking glass or make it a candle well worth keeping
 

UncleBruce

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The Headless huch it is still cool you could always cut some of the top off and make it a drinking glass or make it a candle well worth keeping
I wouldn't mess with it too much. I believe most if not all North Dakota embossed bottles, especially small towns, are pretty tough/rare even damaged. Might want to research it a bit.
 

RCO

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likely the railroad , people sill traveled around a lot back then , someone had some connection to both places likely and brought it back with them
 

RCO

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I suspect that another reason sodas would travel absurd distances is that bottlers would buy second hand bottles from other firms at a deep discount. I once found a shard of an embossed soda from Goderich, Ontario on Vancouver Island - that's over two thousand miles away, including a boat ride, and Goderich is a small town far from any major population centres or main passenger rail corridors. What was stranger, though, was that I had recently purchased an intact example of that same bottle from a local digger's dollar bin. I can't imagine that some obscure small town bottler was distributing soda that far away, and it seems unlikely for one person to have brought enough bottles on a trip for them to end up in at least two separate dumps, so the only conclusion I can think of is that one of the local bottlers had been using them.

Another more well-known example of this is Solo, which was briefly an unsuccessful 1940s Montreal brand and then became one of the most popular sodas in the Caribbean as an entirely unrelated beverage. The defunct company's bottles were sold to somebody in Trinidad, and the bottler there decided to keep the old branding. This new operation was so successful and the old bottles became so iconic that the modern plastic bottles are still obviously modeled after a 40s ACL.
View attachment 231284

never heard of the Solo story before , seen the montreal bottle but unaware it carried on in the Caribbean

what goderich bottle was found in BC , can't even think of that many embossed bottles from that town .
 

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