"Fill line" / "stopping point"

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Astokes85

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Hey guys. We came across this bottle and have been doing some research. I've noticed sometimes height is included which helps narrow it down. Also, we find ourselves measuring the liquid that goes inside to narrow it down some more, natural process of elimination. We narrowed it down to 1840-60. Maybe not that late even.

So I have looked and looked, back then may not have been as precise on measurements and this may seem like a stupid question.

So on jars where would the "fill point" be?

On bottles for ale, beer etc?

I'll post some pics of the bottle we are working on now because I'd like to know some opinions on the color. Yellow olive, dark olive. Thanks guys.
 

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Harry Pristis

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Black glass is commonly the result of glass melt in a coal-fired reduction furnace. Yellow-olive is the common color of glass from the Low Countries, but the range of green - olive-green - olive-amber depends on the locally derived ingredients where the glass is produced. Remarkably, the color of the glass is also affected by the time of residence in the melting pot.

winesealedtrio.jpg
 
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ROBBYBOBBY64

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Hey guys. We came across this bottle and have been doing some research. I've noticed sometimes height is included which helps narrow it down. Also, we find ourselves measuring the liquid that goes inside to narrow it down some more, natural process of elimination. We narrowed it down to 1840-60. Maybe not that late even.

So I have looked and looked, back then may not have been as precise on measurements and this may seem like a stupid question.

So on jars where would the "fill point" be?

On bottles for ale, beer etc?

I'll post some pics of the bottle we are working on now because I'd like to know some opinions on the color. Yellow olive, dark olive. Thanks guys.
Generally speaking, wine and champagne are bottled with 1- 1¹/²" of space or headroom before the cork.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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Has to have air space for the intense pressure that builds up inside the bottle.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

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