found these little bottles in friend's driveway while picking up broken glass

ccpe

Well-Known Member
I went to pick up the broken glass in my friend's driveway to make beach glass and found these little bottles intact. There was a lot of old purple broken glass. Can anyone tell me the real reason some glass turns purple with age? I've heard a lot of different reasons. Thanks!
 

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Skadman4

Well-Known Member
I went to pick up the broken glass in my friend's driveway to make beach glass and found these little bottles intact. There was a lot of old purple broken glass. Can anyone tell me the real reason some glass turns purple with age? I've heard a lot of different reasons. Thanks!
An interesting characteristic of colorless glasses which contain manganese dioxide as a decolorizer is their tendency to turn different shades of purple when exposed to the rays of the sun or to other ultra-violet sources. ... This changes the manganese compound into a form that causes the glass to turn purple.

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ccpe

Well-Known Member
is either an old dump where your friends drive is or

her drive was made using fill from sand / gravel that contained parts of an old dump / broken glass

I am finding that there are old dump sites all over north FL. I'm pretty sure this was a dump site because they haven't imported any sand/gravel. I'm going to check out 2 sites this week that I know were used for dumps. Hoping to find something good! What a great way to spend Mother's Day!
 

ccpe

Well-Known Member
An interesting characteristic of colorless glasses which contain manganese dioxide as a decolorizer is their tendency to turn different shades of purple when exposed to the rays of the sun or to other ultra-violet sources. ... This changes the manganese compound into a form that causes the glass to turn purple.

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I have heard that the glass after the 1915's doesn't change to purple. Is that true? I was told it had something to do with sand from Germany that was not imported after WWI. Thanks!
 

Skadman4

Well-Known Member
I have heard that the glass after the 1915's doesn't change to purple. Is that true? I was told it had something to do with sand from Germany that was not imported after WWI. Thanks!
As far as I understand the concept, I don't think that's a true possibility. Basically as the glass industry grew they made better materials for the clarity stability and quality. I think that if they were importing sand, that alone would be very costly and the general population would have been hard pressed to afford. The fact that I've seen ball and other fruit jars be "nuked" to force the color change in order to get premium prices for average jars otherwise, leads me to think that it was a mass use material for a while and the potential for a lot of products to change in uv exposure is a neat but novelty thing. If it is true purple or made originally as purple then I see the expenses, but to have a $2 jar go to $200 because it's claimed as a purple Mason or what not is an absolute shame.

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ccpe

Well-Known Member
As far as I understand the concept, I don't think that's a true possibility. Basically as the glass industry grew they made better materials for the clarity stability and quality. I think that if they were importing sand, that alone would be very costly and the general population would have been hard pressed to afford. The fact that I've seen ball and other fruit jars be "nuked" to force the color change in order to get premium prices for average jars otherwise, leads me to think that it was a mass use material for a while and the potential for a lot of products to change in uv exposure is a neat but novelty thing. If it is true purple or made originally as purple then I see the expenses, but to have a $2 jar go to $200 because it's claimed as a purple Mason or what not is an absolute shame.

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Thanks for the insight. I always wondered why the US would need to import sand. Thanks!
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
I have heard that the glass after the 1915's doesn't change to purple. Is that true? I was told it had something to do with sand from Germany that was not imported after WWI. Thanks!
It was obtaining manganese that was the issue. War use and other factors. Harry's reply says it better than I ever could have.
Happy Mothers Day!
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

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