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G1-16 Washington/Eagle flask

mkledford1

Member
Jan 30, 2019
12
3
I found a G1-16 Washington /Eagle flask and was wondering if anyone had any info about it. What I know; or think I know.... Was that is was made in 1823. Has the Bust of George Washington one side and the Coat of Arms eagle of the other. Mine is the earlier one because it doesn't have the " E Plurubus Unum" on it. Nice Pontil mark and tooled neck. Are these flask rare? valuable? Any info would be appreciated. Mike
 

sandchip

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
4,654
63
Georgia
McKearin-Wilson lists it as comparatively scarce. Having it cleaned by the right professional would do wonders for it. It's a really great looking flask. Starting by checking auction records for what ones have sold should give you an idea of what it should be worth. Thanks for sharing it with us. Killer bottle.
 

Old Wiltshire

Well-Known Member
Jan 10, 2017
141
2
Wiltshire UK
Hi Mike,

You may already be aware of some or all of the following but for the wider audience a little background on Thomas W. Dyott whose initials appear on your flask which is, I believe, the predecessor of the 'Firecracker flask'.

The following brief biography is from the online Encyclopedia Brittanica.


Thomas W. Dyott

AMERICAN GLASSMAKER

Thomas W. Dyott , (born 1771, England—died Jan. 17, 1861, Philadelphia), British-born American patent-medicine king, glassmaker, temperance advocate, and reformer. His “picture bottles” have special value as antiques.

A druggist’s apprentice in London, Dyott arrived in Philadelphia in the 1790s almost penniless and rented a basement room where by day he polished shoes and by night manufactured shoeblack. In 1807 he opened a drugstore, added “M.D.” to his name, and soon became the largest dealer of “family medicines” in the country. Among his better-selling products were Infallible Worm Destroying Lozenges and Vegetable Nervous Cordial. As his medicines required many bottles, in 1833 he purchased the Kensington (Pennsylvania) Glass Works, where he employed 400 workers. Here he found an outlet for his Utopian ambitions. No liquor was permitted in Dyottville, or “Temperanceville,” as the factory community was called, although the “doctor’s” own medicines had a high alcoholic content. Workers rose to a daylight bell, had set times for baths, were served refreshments during breaks, and after supper and an hour’s leisure, attended night school and prayers. When the bank Dyott had established failed, he was sentenced to a short term in the penitentiary. Afterward, he returned to his drugstore and rebuilt his fortune before his death.

The Kensington output consisted of whiskey flasks, patent-medicine and pickle bottles, snuff jars, demijohns, and carboys in “bottle colours,” ranging from clear and aquamarine to dark olive, amber, and sage green. The popular and widely imitated George Washington, Jenny Lind, and Louis Kossuth bottles originated there.




Portrait of Dr. Thomas W. Dyott by Ferdinand J. Dreer c1836

As an aside here is a link to a pdf giving the history and background of the
'Firecracker flask'. which was derived from Mike's type of flask.


-

As to its value, as has been suggested, checking auction records will probably
give the best guide as to its potential current worth.

:)
 
Last edited:

mkledford1

Member
Jan 30, 2019
12
3
Hi Mike,

You may already be aware of some or all of the following but for the wider audience a little background on Thomas W. Dyott whose initials appear on your flask which is, I believe, the predecessor of the 'Firecracker flask'.

The following brief biography is from the online Encyclopedia Brittanica.


Thomas W. Dyott

AMERICAN GLASSMAKER

Thomas W. Dyott , (born 1771, England—died Jan. 17, 1861, Philadelphia), British-born American patent-medicine king, glassmaker, temperance advocate, and reformer. His “picture bottles” have special value as antiques.

A druggist’s apprentice in London, Dyott arrived in Philadelphia in the 1790s almost penniless and rented a basement room where by day he polished shoes and by night manufactured shoeblack. In 1807 he opened a drugstore, added “M.D.” to his name, and soon became the largest dealer of “family medicines” in the country. Among his better-selling products were Infallible Worm Destroying Lozenges and Vegetable Nervous Cordial. As his medicines required many bottles, in 1833 he purchased the Kensington (Pennsylvania) Glass Works, where he employed 400 workers. Here he found an outlet for his Utopian ambitions. No liquor was permitted in Dyottville, or “Temperanceville,” as the factory community was called, although the “doctor’s” own medicines had a high alcoholic content. Workers rose to a daylight bell, had set times for baths, were served refreshments during breaks, and after supper and an hour’s leisure, attended night school and prayers. When the bank Dyott had established failed, he was sentenced to a short term in the penitentiary. Afterward, he returned to his drugstore and rebuilt his fortune before his death.

The Kensington output consisted of whiskey flasks, patent-medicine and pickle bottles, snuff jars, demijohns, and carboys in “bottle colours,” ranging from clear and aquamarine to dark olive, amber, and sage green. The popular and widely imitated George Washington, Jenny Lind, and Louis Kossuth bottles originated there.




Portrait of Dr. Thomas W. Dyott by Ferdinand J. Dreer c1836

As an aside here is a link to a pdf giving the history and background of the
'Firecracker flask'. which was derived from Mike's type of flask.


-

As to its value, as has been suggested, checking auction records will probably
give the best guide as to its potential current worth.

:)
Thank you so much!
 

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