Help identifying this bottle

Walker1200

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Hello,

I'm curious about the age of this bottle, and what it was used for. The seam looks like it stops at the shoulder. The bottom has a circular scar...would this be from a pontil? Thank you in advance! Cheers!

-Kerry
 

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Dogo

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A round ring would indicate it was made by an automatic bottle machine which was invented about 1905, but that mark is too uneven. I agree with nhpharm
 

Walker1200

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Thanks guys. If its not a pontil mark, and not an automatic bottle machine mark...any idea what the mark is from?
 

willong

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Thanks guys. If its not a pontil mark, and not an automatic bottle machine mark...any idea what the mark is from?
I'd speculate that the mark developed from wrinkles in the glass gather. The gather of glass on the end of the blowpipe is inserted in the mold; mold is closed; the sagging "glop" at the bottom of the gather contacts the (relatively) cool bottom of the mold and loses some plasticity at that contact point while the rest of the gather is blown out into the mold's interior.

I'm not a glass blower, but I am just trying to account for the mark from, hopefully, a logical analysis. The dimpled surface on bottles that we enthusiasts like to call "whittle marks" are known to result from cold iron mold contact in reality, not from crudely whittled wooden mold interiors.

If someone has a different explanation, I'm always interested in alternative theories.
 

Jamdam

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I'd speculate that the mark developed from wrinkles in the glass gather. The gather of glass on the end of the blowpipe is inserted in the mold; mold is closed; the sagging "glop" at the bottom of the gather contacts the (relatively) cool bottom of the mold and loses some plasticity at that contact point while the rest of the gather is blown out into the mold's interior.

I'm not a glass blower, but I am just trying to account for the mark from, hopefully, a logical analysis. The dimpled surface on bottles that we enthusiasts like to call "whittle marks" are known to result from cold iron mold contact in reality, not from crudely whittled wooden mold interiors.

If someone has a different explanation, I'm always interested in alternative theories.
Great comment. Always confusion about “whittling”. A glass blower told me a cold iron molds and hot glass produced steam which resulted in the whittled look. Anyone else heard this?
 

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