Help needed re identification & dating

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Hallibag

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I’ve just spent about an hour at the Society for Historical Archaeology’s bottle dating website and am now more confused about this bottle than when I started! So, if anyone will help me identify this bottle, I would be very grateful.

This is a green glass bottle, about 10” tall. I can see no mould seams anywhere, but its shape is quite symmetrical . It has a kick-up base, and what appears to be the remains of a metallic label of some kind around its neck.

F1CB8012-1F38-4AEE-A96C-1679F2AECACC.jpeg
Would this be a free-blown wine bottle? If so, when would it date to? My best guess in mid-1800’s but I have no confidence in this!

Please find photos attached.

3627F366-7B56-407D-B6C9-B3193ED780A8.jpeg
60BE8C0F-E08C-4C84-B4BE-3B133B0D326E.jpeg
5385EC96-A9B8-48BB-BC01-5EED9806D2FB.jpeg
DB0830C7-C011-476B-8F58-66205908DCD9.jpeg
B02D08DE-AD04-4983-AA8E-7DC22A055A00.jpeg
 

Dogo

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You have a machine made wine bottle. The square lip says wine. and the dimple in the bottom was probably for part of the handling process.
 

Old man digger

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I’ve just spent about an hour at the Society for Historical Archaeology’s bottle dating website and am now more confused about this bottle than when I started! So, if anyone will help me identify this bottle, I would be very grateful.

This is a green glass bottle, about 10” tall. I can see no mould seams anywhere, but its shape is quite symmetrical . It has a kick-up base, and what appears to be the remains of a metallic label of some kind around its neck.

View attachment 233169Would this be a free-blown wine bottle? If so, when would it date to? My best guess in mid-1800’s but I have no confidence in this!

Please find photos attached.

View attachment 233164View attachment 233165View attachment 233166View attachment 233167View attachment 233168
When stationed in the Canal Zone in Panama I would dig lots of these bottles. They are what I was told done in a "Turn Mold". That is why you see no seam on the bottle. The lip was applied in the normal fashion by the blowers' assistant after it was released from the mold. I have saved some of these bottles and I can tell you, if you twonked someone in the head with one they would have a fractured skull. The dumps I dug these in covered several decades and the years would cover from the 1850's as you suggest all the way up to the late 1800's. So, to try to pin it down may be a difficult task.
 

Old man digger

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I find ones like this from the 1930's. Not saying yours is that new but it looks to be. Bigger ones in the same spot held Gordon's gin. They were acl bottles, crusty but still legible, very thick green glass.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
Robby, are you talking about the bottle that is shown, or the ones I found in Panama? All the sites I dug were either from when the French were trying to build the Canal or when the US. took over. So we are looking at 1899 or earlier.OMD
 

Hallibag

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When stationed in the Canal Zone in Panama I would dig lots of these bottles. They are what I was told done in a "Turn Mold".

Thank you, Old Man Digger. I wondered if it might be a turn mold bottle but understood that there should be faint, concentric rings visible if it was, and I can’t see any on this bottle. I guess it’s just the exception to prove the rule!
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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Robby, are you talking about the bottle that is shown, or the ones I found in Panama? All the sites I dug were either from when the French were trying to build the Canal or when the US. took over. So we are looking at 1899 or earlier.OMD
I was just mentioning ones I find that look similar.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

Harry Pristis

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French turn-mold wine bottle, likely 1900-1920s. Turn-mold bottles don't have applied lips. The French had bottle-making machines for these bottles, though I am not certain just when the turning was first done by the machine. To reliably date these well-made bottles, you really need to rely on associated finds.
 

Old man digger

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French turn-mold wine bottle, likely 1900-1920s. Turn-mold bottles don't have applied lips. The French had bottle-making machines for these bottles, though I am not certain just when the turning was first done by the machine. To reliably date these well-made bottles, you really need to rely on associated finds.
Seems like the lip is different on those bottles that I dug in Panama. Should have checked closer before I stated what I did. Sorry if I through a curve at you but it was not intentional. And the idea of checking with the associated finds in the same hole makes sense too. OMD
 

slcholt

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I’ve just spent about an hour at the Society for Historical Archaeology’s bottle dating website and am now more confused about this bottle than when I started! So, if anyone will help me identify this bottle, I would be very grateful.

This is a green glass bottle, about 10” tall. I can see no mould seams anywhere, but its shape is quite symmetrical . It has a kick-up base, and what appears to be the remains of a metallic label of some kind around its neck.

View attachment 233169Would this be a free-blown wine bottle? If so, when would it date to? My best guess in mid-1800’s but I have no confidence in this!

Please find photos attached.

View attachment 233164View attachment 233165View attachment 233166View attachment 233167View attachment 233168
It's a champagne from the early 1900's. They were almost indestructible because of the kick up and heavy glass so there are many out there. They had a foil wrap around the neck usually with a name and then a paper label. this one is nice and clean but common.
 

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