I'm thinking this is some sort of modern reproduction mason jar.

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DavidW

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Hi Matt B! This is absolutely a 100% original, authentic jar. The jar is listed as jar #305 on page 12 of the reference book "The Fruit Jar Works Volume 1" by Alice Creswick. (Mold numbers on the bottom aren't mentioned for this jar). I will attach a photo of the top half of this page in that book. This book is one of the early companion hardcover SERIOUS RESEARCH volumes with the jar numbers that the "REDBOOK" is based on.
I don't quite understand why, but many of the jar numbers assigned to jars illustrated in the original Fruit Jar Works books (and the accompanying RedBook) were later re-numbered so they can be hard to find in the more recent Redbook editions. WHY WAS THIS DONE??? In the newer Redbooks (I don't have the very latest, I have #11) the jar #305 is a totally different jar!!!! Why?
I've tried to look through my Redbook to find what number your jar is now listed under. Didn't see it, but I haven't been very thorough! SOMEONE, PLEASE look through their new Redbook slowly and carefully and tell us what jar number this variant has been assigned!! THANKS!
OK, I'm back with an update to my post yesterday. Matt B, I believe your jar is listed in the newer editions of the Redbook as jar #253. (Formerly jar #305). However, the entry has a mistake - it states "dropped a" which is not correct, that jar has an "undropped a". The "dropped a" notation in the book means the "a" in BALL has an "ascender" (introductory/leading stroke on lower left of letter). An "undropped a" means there is NO ascender which is true about your jar.

I hope this actually helps, and doesn't confuse!!
 

Matt B

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Well, a lot of the older jars (from many glass companies) are actually in very light shades of aqua. Not to split hairs but your jar would probably be classed as "light aqua", "pale aqua" or "ice aqua". Not really "clear". I assume it has a ground lip. Can you post a picture of the lip ? (It's nice to have the lid, but it is also good to be able to see the lip / top of the jar clearly as this can (sometimes) help with identification.
Another bit of trivia -- nearly all authentic older jars will have at least a trace of "use scratches". If you hold up the jar to a bright light, and study the surface, moving it back and forth at an angle, can you see a few very faint surface scratches or maybe faint traces of haziness? Most newer repro jars are made with glass that has no scratches AT ALL. There's just something about them that is hard to define.
The lip is a bit... Rough. I certainly wouldn't want to use it as a drinking glass.
 

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Matt B

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That is ground lip alright.
So I guess taking into account the imperfections in the glass (wavy sides, imperfections and bubbles in glass) and the ground lip, the jar is authentic. So cool to have something in your hands that is older than your oldest living relative, and something so simple, but that was very relevant at the time it was manufactured.

Today, this stuff spools off of production lines at warp speed, each perfectly made, with nothing to identify it or make it special except for a paper label. The poor collectors a hundred years from today will have no way to differentiate one year or brand from another.
 
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Mailman1960

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So I guess taking into account the imperfections in the glass (wavy sides, imperfections and bubbles in glass) and the ground lip, the jar is authentic. So cool to have something in your hands that is older than your oldest living relative, and something so simple, but that was very relevant at the time it was manufactured.

Today, this stuff spools off of production lines at warp speed, each perfectly made, with nothing to identify it or make it special except for a paper label. The poor collectors a hundred years from today will have no way to differentiate one year or brand from another.
There's a lot of bottles I dig up now that had paper labels, they still make a lot embossed bottles. Who knows in the next 100 years what people digging up find interesting.
 

DavidW

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So I guess taking into account the imperfections in the glass (wavy sides, imperfections and bubbles in glass) and the ground lip, the jar is authentic. So cool to have something in your hands that is older than your oldest living relative, and something so simple, but that was very relevant at the time it was manufactured.

Today, this stuff spools off of production lines at warp speed, each perfectly made, with nothing to identify it or make it special except for a paper label. The poor collectors a hundred years from today will have no way to differentiate one year or brand from another.
Well, actually I would tend to agree that modern bottles and jars are usually boring and they all look alike, BUT many modern bottles (but not all) have year date codes on them - if you know where to look and how to read them. Especially soda and beer bottles.
 

dab46

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check around # 260 261 in red book I have a #9 book
 

diktheduk

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Hi Matt B! This is absolutely a 100% original, authentic jar. The jar is listed as jar #305 on page 12 of the reference book "The Fruit Jar Works Volume 1" by Alice Creswick. (Mold numbers on the bottom aren't mentioned for this jar). I will attach a photo of the top half of this page in that book. This book is one of the early companion hardcover SERIOUS RESEARCH volumes with the jar numbers that the "REDBOOK" is based on.
I don't quite understand why, but many of the jar numbers assigned to jars illustrated in the original Fruit Jar Works books (and the accompanying RedBook) were later re-numbered so they can be hard to find in the more recent Redbook editions. WHY WAS THIS DONE??? In the newer Redbooks (I don't have the very latest, I have #11) the jar #305 is a totally different jar!!!! Why?
I've tried to look through my Redbook to find what number your jar is now listed under. Didn't see it, but I haven't been very thorough! SOMEONE, PLEASE look through their new Redbook slowly and carefully and tell us what jar number this variant has been assigned!! THANKS!
Glass looks too slick, too thin with no bottom wear. Have to see and handle in person.
 

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