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Late 1800,s to early 1900,s amber whiskey

Dink1957

Active Member
Mar 28, 2021
35
18
Seattle area
Would this be considered a slick? What kind of value does a bottle like this have? I have a few that look identical except much dirtier...and what is a hutch?
 

TxBottleDigger

Well-Known Member
Jul 1, 2020
144
43
Southern Texas
Would this be considered a slick? What kind of value does a bottle like this have? I have a few that look identical except much dirtier...and what is a hutch?
Yes, this would absolutely be considered a slick. This is the optimity of a slick. Generally any 1900-modern slick is not worth very much unless they are unusual or unique. Most slicks from that time range go for $20 at the most. Slick whisky cylinders are worth $5-$10. A Hutch refers to a bottle which would have had the Hutchinson closure which was primarily and popularly used for a lot of sodas until they started to phase out when the crown top bottle top came out in the early 1890s in which you would use a bottle cap opener top open it. The crown top is still used and is virtually on almost all existent glass beer bottles to this date. How you would open a Hutchinson stopper is by pressing down on the spring thus, releasing the rubber seal from the lower part on the inside of the finish (top) of the bottle. Hutchinson bottles were made from 1879-1912 and generally did not have a neck for the top. In addition; the top of the bottle was a “blob top”. I will insert some photos of Hutchinson’s to familiarize you with them. None of which of the ones photographed are owned by me.
46D1417E-C7EB-4AFA-AD43-EA1B52C5CE76.jpg

56ECFC2F-6B98-4E0A-AF8D-24657D608686.jpeg

B3D62231-ADAE-4135-B4BE-BDA499AA3850.jpeg


DC0CC004-3E2E-4AB9-A516-A0D172C924A0.jpeg
0F3B1AD8-48D3-47D5-96EB-0EB1765CD6CB.jpeg
39B092F0-7E3A-4811-BF89-AD6CBE752F58.jpeg
FBE2547C-60A3-4C4F-8375-F34D68B1FEC7.jpeg
 
Last edited:

willong

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2009
307
43
Port Angeles, WA
Is it a 3 piece BIM?
It was not blown in a three-piece mold. If it had been, you would at the very least see the seam running around the cylinder portion of the bottle below the shoulder. And at that, it would have to be positioned 90-degrees out from the photographer's position for one of the vertical seams to not show. Of course, this is assuming it was not "turned in mold" to erase mold seam marks. The bottle does not appear to be turn mold, especially judging by the base photo.
 

east texas terry

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2019
363
93
It was not blown in a three-piece mold. If it had been, you would at the very least see the seam running around the cylinder portion of the bottle below the shoulder. And at that, it would have to be positioned 90-degrees out from the photographer's position for one of the vertical seams to not show. Of course, this is assuming it was not "turned in mold" to erase mold seam marks. The bottle does not appear to be turn mold, especially judging by the base photo.
Thank for the info
 

buriedtreasuretime

Well-Known Member
May 10, 2009
120
28
It was not blown in a three-piece mold. If it had been, you would at the very least see the seam running around the cylinder portion of the bottle below the shoulder. And at that, it would have to be positioned 90-degrees out from the photographer's position for one of the vertical seams to not show. Of course, this is assuming it was not "turned in mold" to erase mold seam marks. The bottle does not appear to be turn mold, especially judging by the base photo.
This is interesting, the turn in the mold. And the turn would erase the seam marks including the one at the top of the cylinder?


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