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Manufacturing flaws

opmustard

Well-Known Member
Jan 14, 2021
162
43
O.K. I am a real newby when it comes to insulators.
I know about what is O.K. with bottle flaws, but not with insulators.
Can anyone on the forum give me any clues what is O.K. when it comes to manufacturing flaws with insulators?
Example, I have a really nice deep purple CD 121 and the embossing has some manufacturing flaws to it (no damage.)
I am eyeing a really nice CD121 with manufacturing flaws (indents on the top, but no damage) to possibly buy.
opmustard
 

nydigger

Well-Known Member
Oct 6, 2010
680
28
Monroe, New York
Pics of the flaws? Brookfields are notorious for poor quality control. Generally manufacturing flaws dont detract from value, can infact add it depending on the flaws. Most common flaws are amber streaks caused by Iron, pieces of the firebrick, and black carbon streaks caused by organic materials that fell into the molten glass. Occasionally you will find nails or even bottle caps.

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Joelbest

Bucks
Jan 20, 2021
48
18
Hamilton Ontario Canada
O.K. I am a real newby when it comes to insulators.
I know about what is O.K. with bottle flaws, but not with insulators.
Can anyone on the forum give me any clues what is O.K. when it comes to manufacturing flaws with insulators?
Example, I have a really nice deep purple CD 121 and the embossing has some manufacturing flaws to it (no damage.)
I am eyeing a really nice CD121 with manufacturing flaws (indents on the top, but no damage) to possibly buy.
opmustard
From what I understand if an insulator had flaws it means it wasn’t used. They had to be perfect to work properly therefore flawed pieces were cast aside.
 

nydigger

Well-Known Member
Oct 6, 2010
680
28
Monroe, New York
Incorrect, flawed insulators were most definitely used, unless they were flawed to the point they wouldn't hold a wire tie or fit on a pin. Mine that I posted i pulled off poles and they were in service. I have seen over pours and under pours that were in service. As long as the flaw wasn't detrimental to the insulators function it was used.

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opmustard

Well-Known Member
Jan 14, 2021
162
43
First pic is a very good example of amber streaking, second pic the insulator to the left has carbon in it and the last pic has a chunk of firebrick in it.


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Thank you for the pics. Now those are flaws that I can see that would or could add vaue to an insulator.
How about an insulator that has like a mould flaw (a drooping part of the glass or the embossing is somewhat ghosted?)
opmustard
 

opmustard

Well-Known Member
Jan 14, 2021
162
43
Incorrect, flawed insulators were most definitely used, unless they were flawed to the point they wouldn't hold a wire tie or fit on a pin. Mine that I posted i pulled off poles and they were in service. I have seen over pours and under pours that were in service. As long as the flaw wasn't detrimental to the insulators function it was used.

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Same with bottles. I dug a cobalt Smith & Co that at first I thought I had cut into the bottle's side with my shovel. However; after cleaning it, I realized that it was a manufacturing flaw. The color where the cut was a much deeper cobalt, no missing glass, no legs or fractures and it held water in just fine. I still have the bottle after all these years.
Next privy, I pulled out another Smith & Co and it had a indentation on the lip that was another manufacturing flaw.
I guess you have to determine if the adds or takes away from the insulator's appearance and/or value.
Hey, I see that some sellers color their insulators. That sounds like cheating?
opmustard
 

nydigger

Well-Known Member
Oct 6, 2010
680
28
Monroe, New York
Same with bottles. I dug a cobalt Smith & Co that at first I thought I had cut into the bottle's side with my shovel. However; after cleaning it, I realized that it was a manufacturing flaw. The color where the cut was a much deeper cobalt, no missing glass, no legs or fractures and it held water in just fine. I still have the bottle after all these years.
Next privy, I pulled out another Smith & Co and it had a indentation on the lip that was another manufacturing flaw.
I guess you have to determine if the adds or takes away from the insulator's appearance and/or value.
Hey, I see that some sellers color their insulators. That sounds like cheating?
opmustard
Staining is cheating. Its more done by non collectors to make decorative pieces. Most of those sellers state its stained. Just like bottles there are people who irradiate insulators, just like they do with bottles. Older insulators with manganese turn various shades of unnatural looking purples, later ones that have selenium in them turn various shades of unnatural looking amber. I have a comparison pic I will post for you that shows the difference between the produced purples and irradiated. You will also find wild colors produced for the National collector shows, those are marked as such and do have collector value.

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nydigger

Well-Known Member
Oct 6, 2010
680
28
Monroe, New York
Thank you for the pics. Now those are flaws that I can see that would or could add vaue to an insulator.
How about an insulator that has like a mould flaw (a drooping part of the glass or the embossing is somewhat ghosted?)
opmustard
They do add a little value. Misspellings also add a little value as well

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nydigger

Well-Known Member
Oct 6, 2010
680
28
Monroe, New York
Staining is cheating. Its more done by non collectors to make decorative pieces. Most of those sellers state its stained. Just like bottles there are people who irradiate insulators, just like they do with bottles. Older insulators with manganese turn various shades of unnatural looking purples, later ones that have selenium in them turn various shades of unnatural looking amber. I have a comparison pic I will post for you that shows the difference between the produced purples and irradiated. You will also find wild colors produced for the National collector shows, those are marked as such and do have collector value.

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The first pic are 2 commemorative insulators, produced for a show never in service. The second pic is an irradiated CD102, blueish undertones is a dead give away that its altered. Third pic is a comparison, left is a produced royal purple, center is the altered insulator, and right is a natural lavender color or SCA in the bottle world.


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