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MOST OF THESE INDAIN ARTFACT ARE THERE TOOL,S

Antiques214

Member
Feb 3, 2021
18
3
Chandler, Texas
I really like the petrified wood. I find tons of petrified wood pieces while bottle hunting in a couple local creeks so now I have a box full. Yours look shiny, what did you coat them with?
 

east texas terry

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2019
340
93
MOST OF THE STONE ARE NOT NATIVE TO THIS SITE THEY BROUGH IN TO USE THEY DID HAVE A HARDWARE STORE IF YOU DO THIS LONG ENOUGH YOU CAN TELL WHAT NOT NATIVE TO THE SITE
 

east texas terry

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2019
340
93
I really like the petrified wood. I find tons of petrified wood pieces while bottle hunting in a couple local creeks so now I have a box full. Yours look shiny, what did you coat them with?
I REALY CLEAN MY PETRIFIED WOOD I PUT IN THE OVEN AT 450 GET IT REAL HOT TAKE IT OUT AND SPRAY IT WITH A SEM GLOSS POLYURETHAHE IT BRING ALLTHE COLOR OUT
 

Harry Pristis

Well-Known Member
Jul 24, 2003
1,126
83
Northcentral Florida
It is not a problem with these scraps of pet wood, but it is a mistake to use polyurethane on other, possible significant, fossils. There are plastic consolidants, like Butvar B-76, which work better for your purpose, and are reversible (unlike polyurethane).
 

east texas terry

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2019
340
93
THAHK
It is not a problem with these scraps of pet wood, but it is a mistake to use polyurethane on other, possible significant, fossils. There are plastic consolidants, like Butvar B-76, which work better for your purpose, and are reversible (unlike polyurethane).
THANK YOU HARRY
 

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