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Newburgh New York Backyard Dig

SpringHouse

Member
Mar 8, 2020
6
3
Newburgh, New York
Do you collect New York bottles specifically? Or just whatever hits you?
I have been in and around old homes for many years. Worked in the architectural salvage field and now working in preservation and historic site maintenance. Always poking around for junk, extra proud of these bottles as they came from our own back yard.

Also, the stoneware bottle is labeled C&P, for Cunningham & Powers. A family by the name of Cunningham lived in our home in the late 19th century. Looking into that possible connection.
 

yacorie

Well-Known Member
Dec 10, 2018
300
28
CT
I have been in and around old homes for many years. Worked in the architectural salvage field and now working in preservation and historic site maintenance. Always poking around for junk, extra proud of these bottles as they came from our own back yard.

Also, the stoneware bottle is labeled C&P, for Cunningham & Powers. A family by the name of Cunningham lived in our home in the late 19th century. Looking into that possible connection.
that’s cool. I think there was a popular Cunningham from the Philadelphia area that was a big time maker of stoneware too - so maybe that could be a lead.

would love to see other bottles or just cool stuff your saved over the years.

the work I do requires lots of coordination with SHPOs and THPOs and then often recovery and preservation - cool stuff you are doing.
 

SpringHouse

Member
Mar 8, 2020
6
3
Newburgh, New York
that’s cool. I think there was a popular Cunningham from the Philadelphia area that was a big time maker of stoneware too - so maybe that could be a lead.

would love to see other bottles or just cool stuff your saved over the years.

the work I do requires lots of coordination with SHPOs and THPOs and then often recovery and preservation - cool stuff you are doing.
This button came up burried under the original hearth, back then surplus lime from mortar and plaster was sometimes used as a base for dry laid brick or stone.
 

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yacorie

Well-Known Member
Dec 10, 2018
300
28
CT
This button came up burried under the original hearth, back then surplus lime from mortar and plaster was sometimes used as a base for dry laid brick or stone.
very cool. Have you identified it? We find a lot of buttons detecting and I’m often surprised at some of the old ones having makers marks on them
 

SpringHouse

Member
Mar 8, 2020
6
3
Newburgh, New York
very cool. Have you identified it? We find a lot of buttons detecting and I’m often surprised at some of the old ones having makers marks on them
Did some brief research, seems to be civil war or just after. There are several versions if this, no makers marks.

It was encased in lime dust so is not in great shape. There was a huge lime pit nearby, could have even fallen off a coat when unloading kilns! I know many military folks wore thier issued uniforms after the war as well.
 

willong

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2009
156
18
Port Angeles, WA
Not sure, my first guess is that it may be an insulator for passing wires through a timber or stud. It is glazed and has a star imprinted.
The tube component of "Knob and Tube" wiring is what I was immediately thinking.
1585151782594.png


I grabbed the photo from the Web, and it is not the best example. From memory, I believe the tubes, at least some variants, do have a larger O.D. on one end to butt up against, but not pass through, the structural members.
 

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