Pepsi paper labels value....

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UncleBruce

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Believe what you want. I know my bottles. Check with Allan Petretti who wrote the book. It is easy enough to put a cap back on a bottle and fill it with something beforehand. Besides having the bottle full only makes it heavier for shelves and easier to break.
 

Burkenhill

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The Pepsi-Cola company standardized their bottle in 1941 which henceforth had Pepsi Cola vertically embossed 6 times around the shoulder. Bruce is correct. When Pepsi standardized the bottle they also changed from the red and yellow caps to the new red white and blue patriotic caps which also coincided with the US entering WWll.
You bottle collection shown has 4 of the newer, standardized bottles (1941-1950) which have, or should have the RWB caps. The other bottles should have the red and yellow caps. Personally, I wouldn't pay a dime extra for a bottle that is filled and capped because there is no real way to prove or disprove that the bottle contains original contents. I would say that bottles that contain original contents and have therefore been standing around eighty some years will have lost some of the seal and some of the contents will have evaporated over time. Some of your bottles appear to be approximately full, some slightly less so. I've known some disreputable sellers to partially fill the bottle, cap it, then sell it saying it still has some of the original contents! What a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive..... Don't get me wrong, the bottles look great filled and capped. You have some great looking bottles. I'm envious.
Don't despair though, those paper label bottles, particularly those before standardization can be pricy. The 2 Full Glasses neck label bottles are also more rare since the 2 Full Glasses program ran for only a few years, I believe from 1948 to 1951, bridging the logo change from double dot to the single dot.
The non standard bottles with various embossing on them can be really expensive and valuable so it is difficult to provide accurate valuations. I would say your bottles range in value from $20 to $75. I hope that helps.

I included a picture of my 2 Full Glasses collection. There's one missing and Leon won't sell me his 2 Full Glasses, single dot paper label bottle. Or will you, Leon?
Also included is the original patent for the embossed wave bottle.

Rick in BC
 

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Keith1836

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The Pepsi-Cola company standardized their bottle in 1941 which henceforth had Pepsi Cola vertically embossed 6 times around the shoulder. Bruce is correct. When Pepsi standardized the bottle they also changed from the red and yellow caps to the new red white and blue patriotic caps which also coincided with the US entering WWll.
You bottle collection shown has 4 of the newer, standardized bottles (1941-1950) which have, or should have the RWB caps. The other bottles should have the red and yellow caps. Personally, I wouldn't pay a dime extra for a bottle that is filled and capped because there is no real way to prove or disprove that the bottle contains original contents. I would say that bottles that contain original contents and have therefore been standing around eighty some years will have lost some of the seal and some of the contents will have evaporated over time. Some of your bottles appear to be approximately full, some slightly less so. I've known some disreputable sellers to partially fill the bottle, cap it, then sell it saying it still has some of the original contents! What a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive..... Don't get me wrong, the bottles look great filled and capped. You have some great looking bottles. I'm envious.
Don't despair though, those paper label bottles, particularly those before standardization can be pricy. The 2 Full Glasses neck label bottles are also more rare since the 2 Full Glasses program ran for only a few years, I believe from 1948 to 1951, bridging the logo change from double dot to the single dot.
The non standard bottles with various embossing on them can be really expensive and valuable so it is difficult to provide accurate valuations. I would say your bottles range in value from $20 to $75. I hope that helps.

I included a picture of my 2 Full Glasses collection. There's one missing and Leon won't sell me his 2 Full Glasses, single dot paper label bottle. Or will you, Leon?
Also included is the original patent for the embossed wave bottle.

Rick in BC
Beautiful bottle you have there. Thanks for the much needed info. Can you please tell me which bottles in particular out of the 10 bottle lineup picture has the correct bottle cap starting from the left to right? Also are these bottles worth the same with the cap & contents or is it about the same empty without cap? I always wanted to know that answer. I do know that the amber and green beer bottles were used between 1935 & 1940 as supply was hard to get and they used what they can find. I only say that because in those 10 I have there's a 10oz FRANS beer bottle and a 12oz COBLE that are pretty rare w/labels still intact. I assume those command some nice prices. Thanks for any info you can share.
 

Burkenhill

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Beautiful bottle you have there. Thanks for the much needed info. Can you please tell me which bottles in particular out of the 10 bottle lineup picture has the correct bottle cap starting from the left to right? Also are these bottles worth the same with the cap & contents or is it about the same empty without cap? I always wanted to know that answer. I do know that the amber and green beer bottles were used between 1935 & 1940 as supply was hard to get and they used what they can find. I only say that because in those 10 I have there's a 10oz FRANS beer bottle and a 12oz COBLE that are pretty rare w/labels still intact. I assume those command some nice prices. Thanks for any info you can share.
Hi Keith,

I have to say, regardless that some of the caps are incorrect, those are really beautiful examples of Pepsi paper label bottles. I'm drooling as I look at the pictures again.
Like so many things in life there are variations to most rules. Pepsi-Cola had half a dozen different paper labels before the advent and ultimate takeover of the Applied Colour Label (ACL). While close, the standardization of the bottle as I mentioned before did not quite coincide with the change to the patriotic Red, While and Blue colours. It has been said that the change to RWB happened at or around the time the US entered WWll (Dec, 1941 with the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese). Counting from the left in your picture, bottles 4,5,8 and 10 are the standardized bottles. Perhaps equally appropriate are the labels on all the bottles. The labels on bottles 1,2,3,4,5,7 and 9 are the labels first used in 1936 till about 1939 though many bottlers would use up their stock of one style of label before ordering the the newest style from wherever the labels were obtained. Assuming all the labels were applied by the bottler and were not applied by somebody else in the intervening years, those labels of that style would have been retired to be replaced by the one of the next 3 styles. I've added a picture to show some of the other label styles. Note that in the picture provided, it doesn't show the RWB till the 1943 wave label. It shows the RWB bottle cap for the first time in 1943 whereas all the other pictures show the red and yellow cap.
So,--- the variations could come from being refilled and re-capped with the 1940's RWB cap, a bottler in the early 1940's using new caps on old bottles that they were using instead of buying the newer standardized bottles and who also happened to have a significant stock of the earliest labels. It could be but I'm not believing it. Another example are the neck labels. Bottle 1 and bottle 9 have different neck labels than most of the others which sported the "Famous for over 30 Years slogan" on the top of the neck label. Bottles 8 and 10 of course have the 2 Full Glasses neck label, an advertising program used in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Bottle 8 has the early main label with the 2 Full Glasses neck label. They were not used or available for use at the same time so it indicates that the bottler was using up old main labels (1936 - 1939 with the newer, late 1940's neck label.

To try to answer your question about value of filled vs unfilled bottles: A knowledgeable, seasoned collector won't pay any different whether filled or unfilled unless there was some provenance proving the bottle actually contained genuine original contents from the bottler. A neophyte buyer might pay higher if they believed the seller that the refilled bottle contained original contents. The value of the double dot RWB cap by itself is in the $2-$5 range, more if it is uncrimped, less if not.
 
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Burkenhill

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Hi Keith,

I have to say, regardless that some of the caps are incorrect, those are really beautiful examples of Pepsi paper label bottles. I'm drooling as I look at the pictures again.
Like so many things in life there are variations to most rules. Pepsi-Cola had half a dozen different paper labels before the advent and ultimate takeover of the Applied Colour Label (ACL). While close, the standardization of the bottle as I mentioned before did not quite coincide with the change to the patriotic Red, While and Blue colours. It has been said that the change to RWB happened at or around the time the US entered WWll (Dec, 1941 with the bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese). Counting from the left in your picture, bottles 4,5,8 and 10 are the standardized bottles. Perhaps equally appropriate are the labels on all the bottles. The labels on bottles 1,2,3,4,5,7 and 9 are the labels first used in 1936 till about 1939 though many bottlers would use up their stock of one style of label before ordering the the newest style from wherever the labels were obtained. Assuming all the labels were applied by the bottler and were not applied by somebody else in the intervening years, those labels of that style would have been retired to be replaced by the one of the next 3 styles. I've added a picture to show some of the other label styles. Note that in the picture provided, it doesn't show the RWB till the 1943 wave label. It shows the RWB bottle cap for the first time in 1943 whereas all the other pictures show the red and yellow cap.
So,--- the variations could come from being refilled and re-capped with the 1940's RWB cap, a bottler in the early 1940's using new caps on old bottles that they were using instead of buying the newer standardized bottles and who also happened to have a significant stock of the earliest labels. It could be but I'm not believing it. Another example are the neck labels. Bottle 1 and bottle 9 have different neck labels than most of the others which sported the "Famous for over 30 Years slogan" on the top of the neck label. Bottles 8 and 10 of course have the 2 Full Glasses neck label, an advertising program used in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Bottle 8 has the early main label with the 2 Full Glasses neck label. They were not used or available for use at the same time so it indicates that the bottler was using up old main labels (1936 - 1939 with the newer, late 1940's neck label.

To try to answer your question about value of filled vs unfilled bottles: A knowledgeable, seasoned collector won't pay any different whether filled or unfilled unless there was some provenance proving the bottle actually contained genuine original contents from the bottler. A neophyte buyer might pay higher if they believed the seller that the refilled bottle contained original contents. The value of the double dot RWB cap by itself is in the $2-$5 range, more if it is uncrimped, less if not.
 

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hemihampton

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The Pepsi-Cola company standardized their bottle in 1941 which henceforth had Pepsi Cola vertically embossed 6 times around the shoulder. Bruce is correct. When Pepsi standardized the bottle they also changed from the red and yellow caps to the new red white and blue patriotic caps which also coincided with the US entering WWll.
You bottle collection shown has 4 of the newer, standardized bottles (1941-1950) which have, or should have the RWB caps. The other bottles should have the red and yellow caps. Personally, I wouldn't pay a dime extra for a bottle that is filled and capped because there is no real way to prove or disprove that the bottle contains original contents. I would say that bottles that contain original contents and have therefore been standing around eighty some years will have lost some of the seal and some of the contents will have evaporated over time. Some of your bottles appear to be approximately full, some slightly less so. I've known some disreputable sellers to partially fill the bottle, cap it, then sell it saying it still has some of the original contents! What a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive..... Don't get me wrong, the bottles look great filled and capped. You have some great looking bottles. I'm envious.
Don't despair though, those paper label bottles, particularly those before standardization can be pricy. The 2 Full Glasses neck label bottles are also more rare since the 2 Full Glasses program ran for only a few years, I believe from 1948 to 1951, bridging the logo change from double dot to the single dot.
The non standard bottles with various embossing on them can be really expensive and valuable so it is difficult to provide accurate valuations. I would say your bottles range in value from $20 to $75. I hope that helps.

I included a picture of my 2 Full Glasses collection. There's one missing and Leon won't sell me his 2 Full Glasses, single dot paper label bottle. Or will you, Leon?
Also included is the original patent for the embossed wave bottle.

Rick in BC


Did someone mention my name? I might sell it for the right offer? LEON.
 

Burkenhill

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Did someone mention my name? I might sell it for the right offer? LEON.
Hi Leon. Yes, I mentioned your name regarding your RWB, single dot, 2 Full Glasses paper label Pepsi bottle. Yes, I'm still interested in it. Have you decided on a price you'll sell it for?

Rick in BC
 

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