Welcome to our Antique Bottles Community

Your FREE Account is waiting to the Best Antique Bottle Community on the Web.

Register Log in

Pickles and soda

Screwtop

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2018
664
43
Carter County Kentucky
2WEUKA6QOYZZLCYAMKJ643RCWM.jpg
DSC_0821.jpg
DSC_0823.jpg



Here's some new additions I got yesterday for $12. The Cathedral Pickle is really nice, but somehow already got commissioned as a flower vase.


I'm not to sure about the Lima bottle, but it was a nice 1920s slug plate, and who can leave it behind???

The Bennet bottle is obviously the best. I am not sure how a Kansas bottle ended up all the way out here, but it is in mint condition. W.A. Bennet was the founder, and a Civil War officer. He opened up his first business in Pennsylvania in 1866, but quickly moved to Hutchinson Kansas, selling fruit flavored sodas. His sons took over after his death, and landed the company in hot water, when they started using Coca Cola syrups without their permission. That's a big no-no. This bottle dates right around that time frame.
 

Flasks

Well-Known Member
Feb 20, 2020
79
18
You "pickle" is not considered a cathedral pickle but just a pickle, relish, horse-radish or ketchup bottle. This design was patented and used extensively for many years originating in Pittsburgh, Pa. thanks to Mr. Heinz, whom we all know today. This designed started in the late 1860's and was used up through WW2. Your specimen would have been "labeled". The first few years of this design were embossed "HEINTZ", Then followed by "HEINTZ & NOLET" in the late 1870's through the middle of the 1880's. Lastly, colorful labels took the place of embossing. I have found all three over my many years of privy digging with Heintz & Nolet being the rarest. It all started when in the 1860's Mr. Heintz had a most successful tomato crop in Pittsburgh and decided to sell some and this triggered his capitalistic direction. He was a great entrepreneur. Google "Cathedral pickle bottles and you will see instantly the vast difference between your bottle and what is considered a cathedral bottle. I hope this information wasn't disappointing to you as I'm just trying to help you with the correct identification.
 

Screwtop

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2018
664
43
Carter County Kentucky
You "pickle" is not considered a cathedral pickle but just a pickle, relish, horse-radish or ketchup bottle. This design was patented and used extensively for many years originating in Pittsburgh, Pa. thanks to Mr. Heinz, whom we all know today. This designed started in the late 1860's and was used up through WW2. Your specimen would have been "labeled". The first few years of this design were embossed "HEINTZ", Then followed by "HEINTZ & NOLET" in the late 1870's through the middle of the 1880's. Lastly, colorful labels took the place of embossing. I have found all three over my many years of privy digging with Heintz & Nolet being the rarest. It all started when in the 1860's Mr. Heintz had a most successful tomato crop in Pittsburgh and decided to sell some and this triggered his capitalistic direction. He was a great entrepreneur. Google "Cathedral pickle bottles and you will see instantly the vast difference between your bottle and what is considered a cathedral bottle. I hope this information wasn't disappointing to you as I'm just trying to help you with the correct identification.


Not dissapointed, just curious. Same body shape, just without decorations it seems...
 

Members online

Latest threads

Forum statistics

Threads
74,778
Messages
683,889
Members
16,089
Latest member
Bruce Day
Top