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Robert Turlington's Balsam Of Life

Steve/sewell

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2010
6,108
0
This is the most unique American made Robert Turlington bottle I have ever seen.
I believe this bottle to have been made between 1800 and 1815.I also believe it
is a product of the Glassboro New Jersey Heston and Carpenter or just Ed Carpenter's Olive
glass works as it matches in color with other known products from that factory.
The color of the bottle is green with a little aqua .The bottle has some neat striations in
the glass along with thin streaks of coloring in the neck and lip area that is very aqua.
There is a rough pontil and the lettering is barley discernable as it is washed away into the glass.
It is however the length of the neck on the bottle that makes it unique.I have never seen another
with a length of neck this long.I know the early original British versions are clear and more
rounded and quite neat looking also.Some time ago a member here at the forum posted a British
version he had found from the late 1700s


 

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Steve/sewell

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2010
6,108
0
Hi justglass,Your Turlington botle is very old and American made also.If I were to guess I would say 1805 to 1825.By 1835 the rolled lip was being used more on a lot of old medicines and the Turlington balsam bottles were no exception.I have a few bottles similar to yours that I have always felt were as old as the bottle I posted here.

 

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RedGinger

Well-Known Member
Dec 7, 2007
6,425
0
Very nice Turlington's. It's a great bottle with a great history. Thanks for sharing your pictures. It's cool to see all the different examples.
 

Steve/sewell

Well-Known Member
Jan 23, 2010
6,108
0
This last group picture shows what I beleive is my oldest Turlington bottle.Robert Turlington's Balsam was the most widely used medicine of the colonial time period here in Philadelphia.It was inevitable that it would be copied and sold locally.Something to remember is we as a nation had stopped trading with Great Britain from 1776 to 1795.In 1795 the Jay treaty opened up trade with Great Britain once more.It is the period 1775 to 1795 that I beleive a lot of glassware was made in our colonial glass houses. In South Jersey the Stangers,the Heston Carpenter works,and Leesburgh,on into Pennsylvania, Kennsington and Stiegels Manheim works,on into Maryland, Kramers and Amelungs and Federal Hill,into Western Pa.Ohara,New Geneva, to New York Dowesburgh,and on into New England Pitkin,Temple,New Haven ect..All of this glass just needs to be found now.[;)]

 

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