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The goblet that survived

Flasks

Well-Known Member
Feb 20, 2020
79
18
The glass goblet that survived! Pictured are 3 views of a very rare Holloware (not associated with the Co. that produced metal items) goblet. This goblet is one of the Cobalt pieces from a full place setting including dishes of various styles and are traceable back to the mid 1800's. It was the property of Nancy XXXX who's husband, now deceased, was an Admiral in the U.S. Navy during WW2. His grandparents had a full table serving set including 12” plates and ice cream glasses who passed them on down in the family. Mrs XXXX decided to put all these pieces into the dishwasher to clean them. After the completion cycle she opened the door to find hundreds of pieces of blue glass...only this goblet survived which I'm so fortunate to own. I knew of this set of very, rare tableware over 75 years ago and tried to purchase it from her many times, but she said it was going to her sister as she had no children of her own.
Moving forward in time, about 25 years ago, she called and said she had an antique for me. I drove to her home about 14 miles away and she met me at the front door, and with tears in her eyes, handed me this one surviving piece. She told me the story of what had happened. Not only was she extremely angry with herself but I was angry with her although I withheld any signs of my feelings.
The glass in this goblet is light bulb thin and weighs about 1/3 of a typical modern day goblet this same size. When the blow pipe was snapped off after forming the vessel it left a hole. The next step was to fit a solid small plug. Part of this plug was covered with a small ball of tar or pitch like substance to cover and seal the hole. Notice that the contents would be a lot less than what one would expect it to hold.
I love anything glass, especially early glassware and also bottles, as well as American art glass for many years. Due to sheer ignorance, a fantastic table setting was lost to this and future generations.
 

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sandchip

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
4,660
63
Georgia
That is so cool. I've never heard of that ware. This hopefully will serve as a lesson the newbies that visit our forum to never put any antique glass in a dishwasher. Asking for trouble would be putting it mildly as so painfully illustrated by the story you shared with us. Gee whiz, it's tough to think about that happening.

By the way, what glasshouse made those pieces?
 

Flasks

Well-Known Member
Feb 20, 2020
79
18
That is so cool. I've never heard of that ware. This hopefully will serve as a lesson the newbies that visit our forum to never put any antique glass in a dishwasher. Asking for trouble would be putting it mildly as so painfully illustrated by the story you shared with us. Gee whiz, it's tough to think about that happening.

By the way, what glasshouse made those pieces?
I don't know what glass house made those pieces but my guess would be one of the older New England glass houses IF made in this country. I solicit and welcome all information as I got nowhere in my research...can't find anything. It may have come to this country when the original owners came to America, If foreign, I'd suspect Italy as the Italians are known for their beautiful and delicate glass items.
 

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