TOC20 Scotch Whiskey Bottle. 3 pc. mold

ROBBYBOBBY64

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After the torrential rains we had the day before yesterday I went out to a spot i know to look for any washed out bottles. The spot is a steep hill side off a parking lot and it get like a waterfall. There were lots of new stuff and water had eroded cuts deep into the earth. I found a couple of the usual local embossed. Loads of food jars and ketchup bottles. One was this bottle. Stands 11¾" tall and is 3¼" wide at the shoulder. It has, I think some kind of applied tapered double collar? Definitely a 3 pc. molded bottle. It has a 21 on the base. I love the color, not sure what to call it. Lots of bubbles and whittling. What do you think about as far as use and age if possible. Thanks everyone. Oh yeah, It was my birthday on the 25th so this maybe a gift from the rain gods...lol!
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ROBBYBOBBY64

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Wow! I have to thank you Harry, you are an incredible resource. Light amber, TOC20 scotch whiskey bottle. Turn of the 20th century bottle. Window bottle because it looks good in the window. I have it there right now. Thanks again for the great information Harry.
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willong

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After the torrential rains we had the day before yesterday I went out to a spot i know to look for any washed out bottles. The spot is a steep hill side off a parking lot and it get like a waterfall. There were lots of new stuff and water had eroded cuts deep into the earth. I found a couple of the usual local embossed. Loads of food jars and ketchup bottles. One was this bottle. Stands 11¾" tall and is 3¼" wide at the shoulder. It has, I think some kind of applied tapered double collar? Definitely a 3 pc. molded bottle. It has a 21 on the base. Is this considered a type of black glass? I love the color, not sure what to call it. Lots of bubbles and whittling. What do you think about as far as use and age if possible. Thanks everyone. Oh yeah, It was my birthday on the 25th so this maybe a gift from the rain gods...lol!
Nice bottle Robby. I would call it an olive green color, not dark enough to be considered black glass in my opinion.

I've lived most of my life in western Washington state, which is actually a quite populous area, but dense forests cover extensive rolling foothills nearby that ascend to rugged snow-crested peaks cut by wild perennial rivers. Cross the Cascade Mountain Range, which itself harbors several large, roadless wilderness areas and a few national parks, and the high plains begin on the boundary of the Columbia River where the human population density drops precipitously. From there on through the Rockies and into the Black Hills, one can find enough solitude and wild country to satisfy several lifetimes of exploration. What I am saying is that I love The West!

Like butter on my toast, I prefer people when they are spread out thinly. That said, a few circumstances occasionally make me envy Easterners. Their richly varied hardwood forests with a bounty of wild foods to forage is one example. The much longer history of dense human population is another example, albeit a richly ironic one given my stated preference for living and roaming where fewer others dwell. The longer and denser occupation of eastern North America comes into focus quite often in the postings by members of this forum!

Casual walks through neighborhoods where construction exposes old dump sites or cuts 1880's privy pits to provide antique relics is an almost never experience for me. Creek and river banks laden with 19th century discards are nearly as scarce. Moreover, the few water courses that would permit canoe or kayak passage will usually require all of a paddler's skill and attention just to affect the journey; and any sufficiently aged glass contents have long been shattered or swept into the plunging depths of the Puget Sound. I can, and have made, chance discoveries in the woods while hunting or hiking, but they will almost never be earlier than the 1890's at best. Stumbling upon a stone wall from the 1880's with an old farm dump in its corner is nothing but a fantasy in Washington.

Only once did I have an experience such as you describe, which exposed that fine three-piece molded bottle. Decades ago, the steep embankment behind our old, downtown, Port Angeles post office sloughed and slid into the back parking lot of the facility after an especially prolonged and heavy rainfall. (A similar prolonged saturation in 2014 produced the Oso Mudslide* that destroyed 49 homes and killed 43 people.) Nothing great was exposed by the post office slide; but it did provide an unusual experience for me to scramble up onto the raw mud and pick BIM bottles off the surface. Although a slick, my only recovered intact Hutchinson bottle came from that slope.

I enjoyed reading your account and viewing the photos. I wanted to share the only similar experience I've had, memory of which your anecdote elicited. I also wished to point out that we all have features to treasure regardless of where we reside in the great, though presently troubled, country, continent and globe. Mostly, I like it here!

* I was actually trying to get my old motorhome ready to go on a bottle hunting trip on a slope near (less than two miles) to the one which slid when the incident occurred. The RV had been sitting for years and required too much work. So, I was not able to make the trip. Not as strange as 2020 perhaps, but 2014 was a weird one too. That's the same year and month, March, of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappearance.
 

willong

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Wow! I have to thank you Harry, you are an incredible resource. Light amber, TOC20 scotch whiskey bottle. The TOC20 came in different styles of bottle? Mineral water, whiskey, etc.. Window bottle because it looks good in the window. I have it there right now. Thanks again for the great information Harry.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
I think "TOC20" is Harry's shorthand for turn of the twentieth century.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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Nice bottle Robby. I would call it an olive green color, not dark enough to be considered black glass in my opinion.

I've lived most of my life in western Washington state, which is actually a quite populous area, but dense forests cover extensive rolling foothills nearby that ascend to rugged snow-crested peaks cut by wild perennial rivers. Cross the Cascade Mountain Range, which itself harbors several large, roadless wilderness areas and a few national parks, and the high plains begin on the boundary of the Columbia River where the human population density drops precipitously. From there on through the Rockies and into the Black Hills, one can find enough solitude and wild country to satisfy several lifetimes of exploration. What I am saying is that I love The West!

Like butter on my toast, I prefer people when they are spread out thinly. That said, a few circumstances occasionally make me envy Easterners. Their richly varied hardwood forests with a bounty of wild foods to forage is one example. The much longer history of dense human population is another example, albeit a richly ironic one given my stated preference for living and roaming where fewer others dwell. The longer and denser occupation of eastern North America comes into focus quite often in the postings by members of this forum!

Casual walks through neighborhoods where construction exposes old dump sites or cuts 1880's privy pits to provide antique relics is an almost never experience for me. Creek and river banks laden with 19th century discards are nearly as scarce. Moreover, the few water courses that would permit canoe or kayak passage will usually require all of a paddler's skill and attention just to affect the journey; and any sufficiently aged glass contents have long been shattered or swept into the plunging depths of the Puget Sound. I can, and have made, chance discoveries in the woods while hunting or hiking, but they will almost never be earlier than the 1890's at best. Stumbling upon a stone wall from the 1880's with an old farm dump in its corner is nothing but a fantasy in Washington.

Only once did I have an experience such as you describe, which exposed that fine three-piece molded bottle. Decades ago, the steep embankment behind our old, downtown, Port Angeles post office sloughed and slid into the back parking lot of the facility after an especially prolonged and heavy rainfall. (A similar prolonged saturation in 2014 produced the Oso Mudslide* that destroyed 49 homes and killed 43 people.) Nothing great was exposed by the post office slide; but it did provide an unusual experience for me to scramble up onto the raw mud and pick BIM bottles off the surface. Although a slick, my only recovered intact Hutchinson bottle came from that slope.

I enjoyed reading your account and viewing the photos. I wanted to share the only similar experience I've had, memory of which your anecdote elicited. I also wished to point out that we all have features to treasure regardless of where we reside in the great, though presently troubled, country, continent and globe. Mostly, I like it here!

* I was actually trying to get my old motorhome ready to go on a bottle hunting trip on a slope near (less than two miles) to the one which slid when the incident occurred. The RV had been sitting for years and required too much work. So, I was not able to make the trip. Not as strange as 2020 perhaps, but 2014 was a weird one too. That's the same year and month, March, of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappearance.
I know my camera on my phone plays with color especially when I shine light thru it. I have raspberries by the bucket ripening now at the edge of the woods out back. Blueberries are done and i am looking forward to the apples that ripped in the fall. I have lived in N.J. my whole life and have wanted to move somewhere warm. South East or South west. My nephew lives in Seattle. Western bottles are rarer to find due to low population. I never found any bottle from past Chicago area. I am really getting too old to be going to some places I used to enjoy. I can do about a 4 hour walk but then my feet hurt me. This is a new thing just started this year. Thought it was my shoes do I got shoes for hiking LL Bean. It helped for about a week but now has come back. Only last for a while but seems to aggravate it.. so if i walk again it comes back much faster. Every morning I get up too. Weird, I should go see my doctor.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

Harry Pristis

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I know my camera on my phone plays with color especially when I shine light thru it. . . .
Your five images are consistently light amber. Individual computers (and cameras, I suppose) may vary in rendering colors, but I would expect to see some variance between images as the light angles and glass thickness change. I checked on my other computer to look for local color variance -- none I could detect. Olive green is a more common color for scotch whiskey, but this one is amber.
 

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