Tumbling Before and After photos

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webe992

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Cool. I thought the frame would not be strong enough after removing that much material. Can I see a picture of your modification? Did you enlarge the shafts to accommodate the bushings on the end? I have one thats why I ask.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
So I sometimes tumble bottles that don’t fit so I had to cut the side down and just leave the canister open. I usually fill the bottle with the copper and cleaning agents, use a Buffalo Trace whiskey cork to stopper it, wrap it in a couple of shirts so the bottle doesn’t move inside, and then tape the mouth of the PVC closed so it doesn’t try to slide out over time. Not the most professional looking contraption but it gets the job done.
 

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ROBBYBOBBY64

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So I sometimes tumble bottles that don’t fit so I had to cut the side down and just leave the canister open. I usually fill the bottle with the copper and cleaning agents, use a Buffalo Trace whiskey cork to stopper it, wrap it in a couple of shirts so the bottle doesn’t move inside, and then tape the mouth of the PVC closed so it doesn’t try to slide out over time. Not the most professional looking contraption but it gets the job done.
No stopper now. That little plastic tab to control the barrel from shifting. One thing I did was put a heavy rubber band around the barrel in two places for better grip. I also see the frame was flared out to accommodate the new tube. I had the same idea of the open end tube. I didn't think I needed such a large hole. Thanks for the pictures.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

webe992

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A crown top from Hutto, Texas.
 

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Vinewood

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Iron Pontiled Miguel Pons from Mobile, before and after. It took about an hour of demel work to remove the "rough spots" first.
8 days inside/outside 1200 silicon carbide.
8 days inside only silicon carbide. Top plugged, wrapped in towels, tumbled in an 8" canister with 6 other sodas. Bottles are almost vertical while tumbling.
8 days inside/outside in aluminum oxide to polish
8 days inside only aluminum oxide, to finish polishing inside the long neck.
The green E. Carre looked like it had rolled 10 miles down a gravel road before I cleaned it. It also required about 2 hours of dremel work.
 

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Vinewood

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Some iron pontiled Monju's from Mobile, and a photo of my machine with a 8" canister for inside tumbling.
When tumbling just the inside of sodas, I use an 8" to get more revolutions per minute on the machine. Standard size Bitters need a 10" canister for inside tumbling, and sometimes they need to run for double the amount of time since it turns so slowly.
The aqua Monju is not the same exact bottle, but it looked just like the "before" photo before I cleaned it.
 

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Vinewood

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Some of these sodas need a little more work, but still photograph well. They also come in shades of aqua and sapphire blue.
I cleaned the yellow amber and green Sarracenia Life Bitters as well. The labeled one is a later model.
 

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ROBBYBOBBY64

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Thats something else. Dremeling out the rough spots. Do you ever fill or repair any.? I only ask because I have been dabbling in it. Industrial Glass epoxy with alcohol pigments.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

Vinewood

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Thats something else. Dremeling out the rough spots. Do you ever fill or repair any.? I only ask because I have been dabbling in it. Industrial Glass epoxy with alcohol pigments.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
I don't repair bottles with epoxy. If a bottle has missing glass to where it needs repairing, I will send it to Wil M. I use a dremel tool and any one of 50 different rubberized polishing wheels or points to gently remove or alter many types of scratches, gouges, dings, flakes, and small chips. After tumbling and polishing the bottles, most of those imperfections just "disappear" or are no longer distracting. Make sure you select an epoxy that promises not to change color after 15 or 20 years.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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I don't repair bottles with epoxy. If a bottle has missing glass to where it needs repairing, I will send it to Wil M. I use a dremel tool and any one of 50 different rubberized polishing wheels or points to gently remove or alter many types of scratches, gouges, dings, flakes, and small chips. After tumbling and polishing the bottles, most of those imperfections just "disappear" or are no longer distracting. Make sure you select an epoxy that promises not to change color after 15 or 20 years.
Oh yeah. I hate the yellow. I get the rock star epoxy. I mess around with guitars too. Nothing of value. I have done some small bottle repairs. Again, nothing of value. More or less playing. I can reverse anything I have done with heavy duty stripper or acetone. One question... what does Wil M do to a bottle missing part, say the base.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

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