Unexpected early find in the forrest near my house!

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I thought I would just add this to the thread I already started but I have a huge update and I am shaking as I type this. We dug out a pit towards to bottom of the valley, around 20ft away from the river bed, and some beautiful bottles came out, including my first Stone Wear bottle (Possibly a Ginger Beer). Will be posting more updates soon when I get some better finds, but attached at the bottom are some of my favourite finds from today! The Faithfull Winchester Codd bottle was found towards the start and gave us the excitement to dig in that spot. Slowly more and more things came out, just usually though, like slick medicines and some post 1930’s soda’s. But later on, a couple of poison not too far from each other came out. A couple of dates items including the bottle stopper at the bottom, but most were on tin cans or aluminium so it didn’t survive well. And then I found my first ever Ginger Beer. Mine is the J.Pratt & Son bottle from Manchester, but my dad found the C.Jones one from Twickenham! Thank you for showing attention in this post, it really has let me show you my finds, and even if I’m not always finding something good, then I’m always having fun!
 

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crwncrk

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Nice finds, I love to see UK stuff on here, the UK doesn’t seem to have the bottle discussion and show culture that the US has, or maybe I’m just missing something.
 

historic-antiques

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Hi all,
This is my first post on this site and I am excited to share this bottle I found. I was cycling out across the forrest near my house and was on my way to an 1940’s dump site in the forrest. On the way, I stopped by an old Farmstead to have some food, and noticed the valley next to it. It was a deep hill-side and was covered in broken glass and pottery. I was already on my way to another known dump site so told myself I’d go back there later on just before dark. So I went to the normal site, pulled a few nice corkers and a couple of soda’s, then made my way back to the steep verge. Bearing in mind that this is a large valley, so difficult to get up and down from how steep the sides are and has a small part of a river flowing through the bottom. So I began digging, pulled out a few old pieces of pottery and a couple of old paste pots (attached at the bottom) and noticed a few bottle necks poking out of the ditch in the creek at the bottom. Each was pulled out slowly and this is where the highlighted find was pulled. It looks to be before the 1900’s but then I’m not fully sure on how to determine the age. It is a Chemist bottle which reads “Property of Hardy & Son, Chemists, Salisbury” and I would really like your help to identify the age and value of it. Thanks for any help you can give,
Many thanks,
Jack
Hi "Jack" - if bottles you find have 2 mold seams from the bottom, that go to the top, and if the seams stop before the lip/top they are 99% chance of being pre-1903 bottles because the automatic bottle machine was invented in 1903, and 99% of bottles after that had mold seams that go through the lips to the very top. Before 1903 bottles had hand-appplied lips, placed separately on a blown-in-mold bottle. Thus, the mold seam does NOT go into the lips. The automatic bottle machines blew the bottle and formed the top in one mold - nothing hand-applied - and thus the seams go through the lips. You can also look up the names embossed on your bottles to see when companies existed. There are other ways of finding approximate dates of bottles, like if it's a 3-piece mold seamed bottle, or turn-mold bottle, or free-blown, open pontiled; or graphite pontiled, etc. However what I told you above is the very basic way most of us collectors first learned regarding how to date our bottles.
 

historic-antiques

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Hi all,
This is my first post on this site and I am excited to share this bottle I found. I was cycling out across the forrest near my house and was on my way to an 1940’s dump site in the forrest. On the way, I stopped by an old Farmstead to have some food, and noticed the valley next to it. It was a deep hill-side and was covered in broken glass and pottery. I was already on my way to another known dump site so told myself I’d go back there later on just before dark. So I went to the normal site, pulled a few nice corkers and a couple of soda’s, then made my way back to the steep verge. Bearing in mind that this is a large valley, so difficult to get up and down from how steep the sides are and has a small part of a river flowing through the bottom. So I began digging, pulled out a few old pieces of pottery and a couple of old paste pots (attached at the bottom) and noticed a few bottle necks poking out of the ditch in the creek at the bottom. Each was pulled out slowly and this is where the highlighted find was pulled. It looks to be before the 1900’s but then I’m not fully sure on how to determine the age. It is a Chemist bottle which reads “Property of Hardy & Son, Chemists, Salisbury” and I would really like your help to identify the age and value of it. Thanks for any help you can give,
Many thanks,
Jack
By the way, you found some pretty nice, pre-1900 bottles from what I can see. Maybe 1870-1890.
 

historic-antiques

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I thought I would just add this to the thread I already started but I have a huge update and I am shaking as I type this. We dug out a pit towards to bottom of the valley, around 20ft away from the river bed, and some beautiful bottles came out, including my first Stone Wear bottle (Possibly a Ginger Beer). Will be posting more updates soon when I get some better finds, but attached at the bottom are some of my favourite finds from today! The Faithfull Winchester Codd bottle was found towards the start and gave us the excitement to dig in that spot. Slowly more and more things came out, just usually though, like slick medicines and some post 1930’s soda’s. But later on, a couple of poison not too far from each other came out. A couple of dates items including the bottle stopper at the bottom, but most were on tin cans or aluminium so it didn’t survive well. And then I found my first ever Ginger Beer. Mine is the J.Pratt & Son bottle from Manchester, but my dad found the C.Jones one from Twickenham! Thank you for showing attention in this post, it really has let me show you my finds, and even if I’m not always finding something good, then I’m always having fun!
That glass bottle stopper seems to be English. King George and the Queen seem to be on either sides of it. I have old English pennies from the 1920s with a similar portrait of the King, but of course, yours seems to be older, given the date on it - 1902.
 

historic-antiques

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I thought I would just add this to the thread I already started but I have a huge update and I am shaking as I type this. We dug out a pit towards to bottom of the valley, around 20ft away from the river bed, and some beautiful bottles came out, including my first Stone Wear bottle (Possibly a Ginger Beer). Will be posting more updates soon when I get some better finds, but attached at the bottom are some of my favourite finds from today! The Faithfull Winchester Codd bottle was found towards the start and gave us the excitement to dig in that spot. Slowly more and more things came out, just usually though, like slick medicines and some post 1930’s soda’s. But later on, a couple of poison not too far from each other came out. A couple of dates items including the bottle stopper at the bottom, but most were on tin cans or aluminium so it didn’t survive well. And then I found my first ever Ginger Beer. Mine is the J.Pratt & Son bottle from Manchester, but my dad found the C.Jones one from Twickenham! Thank you for showing attention in this post, it really has let me show you my finds, and even if I’m not always finding something good, then I’m always having fun!
Nice small poison bottle in your 4th photo!!!
 

cheromike

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The "SC" bottom mark reminds me of Scottish Central Glass Works, LTD., of Alloa, Clackmannanshire, Scotland, but I do not know when they were in operation.
 

hemihampton

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The internal threaded screw tops kinda give them away as Foreign, or to me in USA Foreign as internal threaded screw tops not as common here in USA. The 1903 Owens Automatic Bottle Machine may of got a slower start over there where you are. LEON.
 

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