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  1. #11
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    Just from what I can see your pistol looks like one I have with the birds head grip and spur trigger, (no trigger guard). I also have a S&W 32 cal black powder revolver that was sold at JW hardware in NY in 1862 but I don't think it's that kind of pistol.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Bottle Finder
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yimbo View Post
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ID:	181149
    Just from what I can see your pistol looks like one I have with the birds head grip and spur trigger, (no trigger guard). I also have a S&W 32 cal black powder revolver that was sold at JW hardware in NY in 1862 but I don't think it's that kind of pistol.
    My first though on seeing the picture of the dug-up revolver was that it was likely something on the order of an early Iver Johnson, Harrington & Richardson, etc. Those were typically cheaper pieces than Smith & Wesson or Colt. It's certainly within the realm of reason to think the owner of one that was worn out and unreliable--particularly one shaving lead upon firing (due to an out-of-time condition)--would opt to discard the revolver rather than invest in repair. The fact that the cylinder was deliberately removed before disposal tends to reinforce this hypothesis in my opinion. Wouldn't you want to prevent injuring a potential finder of a fire-able but unsafe revolver by disposing of the cylinder separately, thus rendering it inoperable?

    I don't know, offhand, if any of the cheaper brands like H&R had spur triggers, though some Irish Bulldog revolvers did. Smith & Wesson model 2 revolvers were, I thought, hinged. I notice that the first revolver you've pictured, like the corroded dump recovery, has a solid frame. What make and model is that piece? It looks like a fairly good candidate for a match.

  3. #13
    The first pistol is a Harrington and Richards Victor 2 1/2 32 cal black powder rim fire with punch mark engraving. I think it's nickel plated but not in good shape. My father-in-law gave me that and the S&W which is also 32 cal black powder rim fire, along with about 25 round someone made up for him years ago. I would say the crusty revolver is a genuine firearm, toys were usually like pot metal and didn't last long underground. The cylinder might have gotten lost so the frame was pitched maybe.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Bottle Finder PlaneDiggerCam's Avatar
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    Nice information, those pictures along with your ideas of disposal make more sense! I am pretty sure that it WAS unsafe and the owner removed the cylinder to prevent a finder injuring themselves.

  5. #15
    Nice bottles. That firearm looks like a very early (1870's-90's) Smith and Wesson .32 or .38 caliber. Doubt very much it's a toy as it has a spur trigger and no trigger guard with rounded butt handle. Also interesting as noted above, the cylinder was removed, but then the retaining/base pin was re-inserted. Interesting finds all.

  6. #16
    may91
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    how did you get your bottle so clean.

  7. #17
    Junior Member New Bottler
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    The pin is my favorite too.



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