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DavidW

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Hello Rick & Carrie! Well, the general shape is called a "wide mouth packer jar" and that means a "generic" jar that could have contained any of many different products. But, since it is amber glass I am guessing it might have been a coffee jar. Some brands of coffee used to be packaged and sold in glass jars.

BUT it might have held some other kind of product. Without a label, it is often a guessing game!

About the markings on the base, Anchor Hocking Glass was formed in 1937 so we can be sure the "24" is not a date code on this particular jar. Sometimes glass companies changed the orientation / placement of codes on the bottoms of their containers, for various reasons, not all of which are known now.

In this case, the four-digit number above the logo (the trademark "H superimposed over Anchor" logo used by Anchor Hocking) is a catalog number (mold number or mold style number) assigned to that particular jar shape/design. That number would appear in paperwork such as invoices, catalogs, and other communications between the glass company and their customers.
The other two numbers are most likely plant location codes and mold numbers. My guess is that the "6" is a factory location code, and "24" is the mold number (mold cavity number). But I might be wrong on that. To be honest, interpreting the markings on the base of bottles and jars can be very tricky. Researchers do the best they can, but mistakes are made occasionally!
Some types of containers are more likely to carry date codes. These include soda and beer bottles. For instance most soda bottles made by Anchor Hocking that I've seen from the 1940s and later have date codes to the right of the logo.
Another clue to age: the "stippling" (textured design) on the base is a characteristic that was gradually implemented on glass bottles in the US beginning around 1940. So we can be sure the jar dates sometime after that year.

I think the jar dates from sometime in the 1940s-1960s, but I know that doesn't narrow it down much! I wish I could be more helpful here. David
 

Rick & Carrie

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What about these?
Same questions, as well as have you ever saw one before? What do you know about this jar design?

We have around a dozen of them in colorless. Ball, Owens-Illinois, Hazel-Atlas and Anchor-Hocking are the manufactures of those that we have looked at. We may have examples by other manufactures.
 

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Rick & Carrie

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A few more photos.
 

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DavidW

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Hi, I think they are all packer jars, and probably held some kind of food product. Without a label it is hard to say for sure. The amber jar might have held some brand of coffee or coffee creamer? As you know, the NW stands for Northwestern Glass Company of Seattle. Without knowing for sure, my guess is the amber NW jar is from the 1940s or '50s. Since it doesn't carry a date code it is hard to date it exactly.
The clear jar marked "3717-6" was made at the Owens-Illinois factory at Oakland, CA. "20" is the Oakland factory location code. The "2" (on that particular jar) probably stands for 1942.

The clear jars look like types that could have held applesauce, mayonnaise, dill pickles, apple butter or other kinds of food. Some jars in grocery stores today are very similar in appearance.

I haven't seen the NW mark in person, as that mark shows up most often along the West coast. From some of your photo angles, the lip contour of that amber jar looks a bit odd. I'm just not sure about it.
There are some rather similar looking clear jars that are marketed as "Specimen jars" and used in laboratories etc. I really don't know for sure if any of them would be that kind of jar.
 

Rick & Carrie

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Hi, I think they are all packer jars, and probably held some kind of food product. Without a label it is hard to say for sure. The amber jar might have held some brand of coffee or coffee creamer? As you know, the NW stands for Northwestern Glass Company of Seattle. Without knowing for sure, my guess is the amber NW jar is from the 1940s or '50s. Since it doesn't carry a date code it is hard to date it exactly.
The clear jar marked "3717-6" was made at the Owens-Illinois factory at Oakland, CA. "20" is the Oakland factory location code. The "2" (on that particular jar) probably stands for 1942.

The clear jars look like types that could have held applesauce, mayonnaise, dill pickles, apple butter or other kinds of food. Some jars in grocery stores today are very similar in appearance.

I haven't seen the NW mark in person, as that mark shows up most often along the West coast. From some of your photo angles, the lip contour of that amber jar looks a bit odd. I'm just not sure about it.
There are some rather similar looking clear jars that are marketed as "Specimen jars" and used in laboratories etc. I really don't know for sure if any of them would be that kind of jar.
Some the jar lips are "Squared Off", while others are "Beveled", or "Tapered". We noted that difference ourselves.
 

Rick & Carrie

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Hi, I think they are all packer jars, and probably held some kind of food product. Without a label it is hard to say for sure. The amber jar might have held some brand of coffee or coffee creamer? As you know, the NW stands for Northwestern Glass Company of Seattle. Without knowing for sure, my guess is the amber NW jar is from the 1940s or '50s. Since it doesn't carry a date code it is hard to date it exactly.
The clear jar marked "3717-6" was made at the Owens-Illinois factory at Oakland, CA. "20" is the Oakland factory location code. The "2" (on that particular jar) probably stands for 1942.

The clear jars look like types that could have held applesauce, mayonnaise, dill pickles, apple butter or other kinds of food. Some jars in grocery stores today are very similar in appearance.

I haven't seen the NW mark in person, as that mark shows up most often along the West coast. From some of your photo angles, the lip contour of that amber jar looks a bit odd. I'm just not sure about it.
There are some rather similar looking clear jars that are marketed as "Specimen jars" and used in laboratories etc. I really don't know for sure if any of them would be that kind of jar.
As for the Northwest Glassworks items; we have a small varied collection.

We have at least four of these.
What type of closure did this jar take? We would like to complete them for our own kitchen deco usage.
 

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DavidW

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Not sure but they look like they would take some size of screw type lid. It may or may not be easy finding new lids of the same exact size and threading to fit well. Maybe try different lids from newer jars and see if any will work well.
By the way, the jar with the #5412 on the bottom is from Glass Containers Corporation based in Fullerton, California.
 

Rick & Carrie

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Not sure but they look like they would take some size of screw type lid. It may or may not be easy finding new lids of the same exact size and threading to fit well. Maybe try different lids from newer jars and see if any will work well.
By the way, the jar with the #5412 on the bottom is from Glass Containers Corporation based in Fullerton, California.
They aren't thread top. Compression or glass insert we think, but which?
 

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DavidW

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It wouldn't be a glass insert in my opinion - unless some kind of "gasket" was used to minimize glass to glass contact.
If they take a "compression" type lid, I think the chances are a lot lower in finding one that fits exactly. I still don't understand just what those jars would have been used for. Maybe try investigating the catalog offerings of modern glass container companies online and see if they have similar compression type closures on any of their modern jars - and what purposes the jars are typically used for?
Any clues from the area where they were found, on what type of business may have been nearby? It sounds like they were dumped by a business that used that type of jar for some purpose. It just seems like jars that most average households would not have used - although I admit I am not familiar with common generic jars that used that type of closure.
Sorry but some of the photos are just a bit indistinct and I had trouble telling what kind of threading or closure is at the very top of the jars. Have you tried investigating Bill Lindsey's webpage on closures on sha.org? Maybe he might have some good info for you if you contact him and send some pics.
I would also suggest posting pics, including closeup pics of the tops, on one of those jar collector discussion groups on Facebook and see if any collectors there would recognize that type of jar closure and what they were more commonly used for. The "Ball Jar Collectors" group discusses all kinds of jars, not just Ball.
 

Rick & Carrie

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T
It wouldn't be a glass insert in my opinion - unless some kind of "gasket" was used to minimize glass to glass contact.
If they take a "compression" type lid, I think the chances are a lot lower in finding one that fits exactly. I still don't understand just what those jars would have been used for. Maybe try investigating the catalog offerings of modern glass container companies online and see if they have similar compression type closures on any of their modern jars - and what purposes the jars are typically used for?
Any clues from the area where they were found, on what type of business may have been nearby? It sounds like they were dumped by a business that used that type of jar for some purpose. It just seems like jars that most average households would not have used - although I admit I am not familiar with common generic jars that used that type of closure.
Sorry but some of the photos are just a bit indistinct and I had trouble telling what kind of threading or closure is at the very top of the jars. Have you tried investigating Bill Lindsey's webpage on closures on sha.org? Maybe he might have some good info for you if you contact him and send some pics.
I would also suggest posting pics, including closeup pics of the tops, on one of those jar collector discussion groups on Facebook and see if any collectors there would recognize that type of jar closure and what they were more commonly used for. The "Ball Jar Collectors" group discusses all kinds of jars, not just Ball.
Thanks for the info. We are members of most of the bottle and jar groups on facebook, and have posted photos to them long before we came here. No one there knew anything certain.
 

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