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Can fruit jars (glass) be an investment???

Kheidecker

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2020
79
8
I've got into bottle hunting but 6 months ago,last 3 months have gotten into jars.ive collected about 150 jars so far,mostly common blue ball jars.alot of research an reading now hunting for more rare an valuable jars. I was wondering if the price of these jars has increased over the last 10 or 20 years and by how much. I keep telling my wife that it could be an investment and was wondering what all you professional collectors thought. Could a $1,000 collection of jars today be worth $5,000 in 20 years?ordered redbook takes up to 2 weeks to receive
 

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CanadianBottles

Well-Known Member
May 24, 2014
2,306
48
I really wouldn't trust bottles or jars as an investment right now. The demographics of the hobby, especially the serious completionist collectors, skew pretty old, and although there are some younger people interested in it I don't think there are anywhere near enough to replace the older generation. Look at what happened to stamp collecting - I don't know if bottle collecting will take the same level of hit but I don't think prices are going to be rising long-term. There's also a level of unpredictability because the state of the economy influences bottle prices a lot, they took a big hit in 2008 and some still haven't recovered to mid-2000s levels. Investing in collectibles is always pretty risky, but I'd never even consider investing in collectibles for a hobby that didn't have a steady stream of young people getting interested in it.
 

Screwtop

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2018
664
43
Carter County Kentucky
I really wouldn't trust bottles or jars as an investment right now. The demographics of the hobby, especially the serious completionist collectors, skew pretty old, and although there are some younger people interested in it I don't think there are anywhere near enough to replace the older generation. Look at what happened to stamp collecting - I don't know if bottle collecting will take the same level of hit but I don't think prices are going to be rising long-term. There's also a level of unpredictability because the state of the economy influences bottle prices a lot, they took a big hit in 2008 and some still haven't recovered to mid-2000s levels. Investing in collectibles is always pretty risky, but I'd never even consider investing in collectibles for a hobby that didn't have a steady stream of young people getting interested in it.


The younger generation needs to get a damn hobby that ain't video games. I am 17, and I have never played a video game in my life, and I'm happy! Bottle hunting, arrowhead hunting, detecting, you name it. If we teach them that it's fun, maybe we'll get interest.

I have come up with my own theory, and that is the 100th anniversary of WWII coming up. During the 1950s, you could buy a Civil War confederate uniform for $10. Post 1965, prices went up dramatically, going up hundreds of dollars over the next thirty years, until they got to $1,000-$25,000 a piece. I expect the same thing to happen with WWII relics. 2039-2045 will be a boon for this type of collecting in my opinion. That's why I am starting to little by little buy up WWII memorabilia when I can find it, especially the German items, that already go for big money.
 

coreya

Well-Known Member
Apr 30, 2007
1,341
38
Summerfield, Fl
I have over 800 mason jars that I've collected over the years along with a couple hundred various old medicine, liquor etc These were collected because I enjoyed the history and stories behind them and not primarily for the value (even though some are up there). When I go they will be someone elses problem but until then I will enjoy them!
 

martyfoley

Well-Known Member
Sep 24, 2019
65
18
Buy what you love, medicines, sodas, etc. Buy the quality bottles and in the best condition you can afford. If you're lucky, over the years prices will appreciate but sadly not a guarantee. Bottles are being dug everyday adding to the supply. Some do get broken over the years but many more are dug. It's hard to say if the bottle hobby is growing and healthy, depends on the economy, and what interests the younger generation. Most young people couldn't give a hoot about antiques, just my opinion, hopefully I'm wrong. I think condition and rarity are the keys to a successful bottle investment. Better to invest in one really good rare quality bottle (that you love and appreciate) for $100 than to have 100 bottles staying at a worth of only $1 each taking up space. Buy what you love, display it proudly, and let the investment do what it may over the years!
 

GatesMillsGirl

New Member
Apr 20, 2019
4
1
Marty, I agree - buy what you love. Chances are our children will not want to keep anything we treasure. It will just seem like junk to them. Be sure to mark the special (worth $) stuff somehow.
 

jarsnstuff

Well-Known Member
Aug 28, 2004
674
18
California
I agree with the "buy what you love". High dollar items generally increase in value over time, the under $10 stuff tends to stay under $10. I have jars in my collection that are worth less than a buck, but they stay in my collection because I like them. I also have jars valued up to $5,000. (okay, only one at $5k, but several over $1k) I've been collecting since 1993, but I was no kid at that point. So the assumption that there won't be younger collectors coming along to take our place just doesn't hold water. Who knows when the collecting bug is going to strike? My kids collect stuff, but they don't collect fruit jars. I figure when I'm gone, my kids will sell my jars and maybe add to their collections of what they do like, not continue the collection of jars just because that's what Mom & Dad collected - that's pretty silly when you look at it that way. The jars are all listed on a spreadsheet so when the time comes, the kids can refer to the spreadsheet to see what they might expect to get when they sell. If it's an investment you're looking for, you'd be better off finding yourself a good investment banker.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

Well-Known Member
Jan 11, 2020
348
43
New Jersey
Obviously better investments out there than bottle collecting. I don't care how much a bottle is worth. I have to say if i like it, thats what matters. Most valuable bottles i own i don't like as much as ones that are worth a fraction of the value. I found alot and thats the best price. It's all about the glass for me personally.
 

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