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Brommas

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Good afternoon everyone,

I am new to the site, reason for my joining was that I have a couple of bottles that I have found over the course of a few years and have never really got anywhere in terms of research of them.

The latest bottle I found last week whilst out on a dog walk through a local wooded area, the bottle is machine made and had the original screw lid with some wording on and is actually in very good condition. The company that sold the product"Saxon" which is the name on the bottle went out of business in 1944(I think it was), the name on the lid(inscribed) is"Bromsgrove mineral water co", the bottle had embossed on it "Saxon balsall heath" and I believe(on the bottom) there are 3 letters F,G,C I believe, hard to make out it could be FCC, this I believe how to a company that was listed as 1910-1920(foster glass company), that's about all I can find, can anyone give me any more of an idea of age please or style etc?, I have another bottle which I will add in a different thread or perhaps later in this one.

Thank you all in advance for anyone that can shed some light on this.
 

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Brommas

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Welcome, Brommas! The bottle looks to be in the art-deco style, so it's most likely from the 1920s to the 1930s.
Many thanks for that. It's obviously been laying in the woods in clear view(where probably 2-300 people a day walk) I am amazed that is in such good condition and never been picked up and removed before. It's a local area where scouts have camps etc and many frequent it daily for walks/jogs etc etc. I was hoping that it was a little younger tbh, but it's one that I will keep, I may post the other bottle that I found some years ago as I have not been able to find anything about that one, anywhere.

Thanks for the reply.
 

ROBBYBOBBY64

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Many thanks for that. It's obviously been laying in the woods in clear view(where probably 2-300 people a day walk) I am amazed that is in such good condition and never been picked up and removed before. It's a local area where scouts have camps etc and many frequent it daily for walks/jogs etc etc. I was hoping that it was a little younger tbh, but it's one that I will keep, I may post the other bottle that I found some years ago as I have not been able to find anything about that one, anywhere.

Thanks for the reply.
I live in one of the most densely populated part of New Jersey and still manage to find my fair share of dumps and surface finds. Some of the 1920-30’s spots go back to the mid 1800’s. The older stuff is just not on the surface like the newer ones.
ROBBYBOBBY64.
 

willong

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Good afternoon everyone,

I am new to the site, reason for my joining was that I have a couple of bottles that I have found over the course of a few years and have never really got anywhere in terms of research of them.

The latest bottle I found last week whilst out on a dog walk through a local wooded area, the bottle is machine made and had the original screw lid with some wording on and is actually in very good condition. The company that sold the product"Saxon" which is the name on the bottle went out of business in 1944(I think it was), the name on the lid(inscribed) is"Bromsgrove mineral water co", the bottle had embossed on it "Saxon balsall heath" and I believe(on the bottom) there are 3 letters F,G,C I believe, hard to make out it could be FCC, this I believe how to a company that was listed as 1910-1920(foster glass company), that's about all I can find, can anyone give me any more of an idea of age please or style etc?, I have another bottle which I will add in a different thread or perhaps later in this one.

Thank you all in advance for anyone that can shed some light on this.
Welcome to the site.

Nice bottle--I've always found internal screw-threads an interesting innovation in closures. Decades ago, I dug an earlier-vintage example of the type, an amber "Crown Distilleries Company" bottle, blown in mold, tooled finish that featured internal threads. The specific way that the lip of the bottle was deeply chipped in three places always lead me speculate that the original user was frustrated with that "dang stuck cork" and tried to pry the stopper out with an ice pick.

P1000563.JPG
 

Brommas

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Welcome to the site.

Nice bottle--I've always found internal screw-threads an interesting innovation in closures. Decades ago, I dug an earlier-vintage example of the type, an amber "Crown Distilleries Company" bottle, blown in mold, tooled finish that featured internal threads. The specific way that the lip of the bottle was deeply chipped in three places always lead me speculate that the original user was frustrated with that "dang stuck cork" and tried to pry the stopper out with an ice pick.

View attachment 243764
What an interesting way the bottle has been modified, I follow your thought process and it could well be so, the only other thought I could add(off top of my head don't even know if it's likely), could it be for pouring ease also?.
 

willong

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What an interesting way the bottle has been modified, I follow your thought process and it could well be so, the only other thought I could add(off top of my head don't even know if it's likely), could it be for pouring ease also?.
While I suppose that is possible, I think it is unlikely. The context in which I found the Crown Distilleries bottle would indicate that it was probably an early example of internal-thread stopper--see excerpt from SHA site below--which leads me to think that the user was not familiar with the new-fangled device and applied extra force to pry out the rubber stopper. I've read accounts saying that it was fairly common for people to use ice picks to pry recalcitrant corks free of bottle necks. In an age before refrigeration was common, ice picks were often close-at-hand and probably more common than corkscrews. Of course, my own interpretation could be purely fanciful; and the lip simply collided with a rock when the bottle was discarded :eek:! Whatever the case, such speculating upon events and conditions at a site 125-years-ago is part of the fun of the hobby for me.

From website >>>> https://sha.org/bottle/closures.htm#Inside Thread Stopper

"Hard Rubber: This closure/finish is by far most commonly found on U.S. made mouth-blown, tooled finish liquor bottles produced between the late 1880s and National Prohibition in 1920; and in particular between 1895 and 1915 (Wilson & Wilson 1968; Root 1990)."
 

Brommas

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As I said, I think your statement is the most likely answer, I was purely speculating at a possibility and putting it out there.

Have a great day.
 

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