Portholes From a Shipwreck

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CanadianBottles

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These are some old pictures from when I first found it, I have since cleaned it up:
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I found it in the garbage one cold snowy Feburary morning in 2015. It's a non commissioned staff officer's sword from the Union Army. The blade is German imported made in the 1850's. I am very persistent when it comes to treasure hunting, checking odd places constantly even if I find nothing for weeks on end, because sometimes a pattern forms, a "find pattern" I call it, where you will statistically ALWAYS find something good in a particular place if you have the patience and persistence to keep checking. I have applied this technique to bottle hunting as well when I got into it in 2020.
Wow, that is incredible! I was imagining it was going to be a rusty and corroded sword you found metal detecting or something, but that thing is stunning, and in fantastic condition! That's a curb find of a lifetime!
 

JerryN

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They seem to be made of some type of bronze, quite resistant to corrosion.
It would be good to verify as some metals need an electrolytic bath to stabilize after being immersed in salt water. I have a porthole that I put in one for a year. If it is brass you are golden.
 

UnderMiner

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It would be good to verify as some metals need an electrolytic bath to stabilize after being immersed in salt water. I have a porthole that I put in one for a year. If it is brass you are golden.
Yeah, I once found an iron artifact in the ocean when I was a kid, put it away, and years later when I found it again it had disintegrated to dust. Now when I find iron artifacts from the sea I have a whole process involving fresh water, boiling fresh water, anti-rust solutions, boiling oil and wax, etc. It takes forever but results in a stable end result. Bassically it's first extracting the salt, then extracting the water, and then filling the pourus metal with an inert non-oxidative preservative.
 

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